Crime

Driver in wrong-way crash that killed Fresno officer was under heavy influence of alcohol, drugs

Funeral services for Fresno police officer Phia Vang

Funeral services for Fresno police officer Phia Vang, who was killed two weeks ago by a wrong-way driver, were held Friday, Feb. 22, at the Fresno Convention Center Exhibit Hall. This was the first day of three days of services for Vang.
Up Next
Funeral services for Fresno police officer Phia Vang, who was killed two weeks ago by a wrong-way driver, were held Friday, Feb. 22, at the Fresno Convention Center Exhibit Hall. This was the first day of three days of services for Vang.

Cameron Pryor, the driver who crashed into Fresno police officer Phia Vang head-on while driving the wrong way on Highway 180 east of Fresno, had a high level of alcohol in his system, as well as a muscle relaxant, and an anti-anxiety drug, according to a coroner’s toxicology report.

The collision took place Feb. 4 as Pryor, 33, the operator of Pryority Real Estate, was driving a pickup eastbound in the westbound lanes of Highway 180 near McCall Avenue about 5 p.m. when he collided with Vang, 48, a 26-year-veteran of the department. Both drivers died at the scene.

Toxicology for Vang found no drugs or alcohol in his system.

According to the report produced by Central Valley Toxicology, Cameron’s blood alcohol level was .15, nearly double the legal limit of .08. The level of Carisoprodol was 11.5 millograms per liter. The report also noted that Pryor had 5.6 millograms per liter of Meprobamate in his system.

pryor (1).JPG
Cameron Pryor Pryority Real Estate Facebook Page

According to the report, the effective level of Carisoprodol is 2.5 to 10 millograms per liter and the effective level of Meprobomate is 10 to 30 millograms per liter. Carisoprodol is marketed under the name Soma.

The federal Food and Drug Administration reports that Carisoprodol is indicated for relief of “discomfort associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions,” and “should only be used for short periods, (up to two or three weeks).” The agency also warns against combining use of the drug with alcohol

The FDA describes Meprobamate as a drug used to treat anxiety disorders and warns that use with alcohol can cause drowsiness or other adverse effects.

Related stories from Fresno Bee

  Comments