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  • Blinded temporarily by staring at your phone? There's a name for that

    Smartphone habits may force doctors to ask patients a few more questions when diagnosing vision or neurological problems. “I think if a person experiences a temporary loss of vision in one eye, that’s potentially a very important problem for which they should seek medical attention,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Dean Wingerchuk. “But it doesn’t always mean there’s an abnormality.”

Smartphone habits may force doctors to ask patients a few more questions when diagnosing vision or neurological problems. “I think if a person experiences a temporary loss of vision in one eye, that’s potentially a very important problem for which they should seek medical attention,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Dean Wingerchuk. “But it doesn’t always mean there’s an abnormality.”
Smartphone habits may force doctors to ask patients a few more questions when diagnosing vision or neurological problems. “I think if a person experiences a temporary loss of vision in one eye, that’s potentially a very important problem for which they should seek medical attention,” says Mayo Clinic neurologist Dean Wingerchuk. “But it doesn’t always mean there’s an abnormality.”

Have a cell phone against your ear? You should consider putting it down

December 13, 2017 12:28 PM

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  • 'Lost Boy' of Sudan escaped war Africa to start a new life helping others in Hanford

    Physician assistant Jacob Ayuen was about 8 years old when he was forced to flee his homeland without his parents, walking for an estimated 1,000 miles to safety.