Letters to the Editor

Guns and America: Letters to the editor, Sept. 22, 2019

An AR-15 assault rifle and thousands of rounds for it are displayed among other weapons, cash and marijuana during a 2012 news conference announcing the seizure during a drug bust in Fresno.
An AR-15 assault rifle and thousands of rounds for it are displayed among other weapons, cash and marijuana during a 2012 news conference announcing the seizure during a drug bust in Fresno. Fresno Bee file

Assault weapons and saving lives

In response to Jerrold Jensen’s recent article (”No buy-back program or confiscation campaign will get rid of all assault style rifles”):

Our nation has experienced a growing fear that has come from these mass shootings and this fear is getting to the point where it is clouding our judgment. I do believe that there is no way a buy back or confiscation program will remove every assault style rifle out of the hands of the American people, but we need to start somewhere.

The reality is that there are too many assault style weapons in the hands of people who have no need to have them, due to the fact that they are either a risk to themselves or the people around them.

With one side adamant on keeping things the way they are in hopes of preserving our constitutional rights, and the other side asking for change in order to avoid the same deadly outcomes that have occurred in the past, our elected officials need to start implementing more regulations if we have any hope of reducing the number of assault rifles out in our streets. Even if new regulations only save one life, it is worth it.

Brandon Guzman, Fresno

Guns are in the fabric of America

In response to “No buy-back program or confiscation campaign will get rid of all assault style rifles,” I partially agree. Implementing a buy back program will only hurt law-abiding citizens since we’ll be the ones handing in our guns while criminals, who don’t follow the law, will still possess their guns.

In this country, we have more firearms than we do people, so it’s only logical that guns aren’t just going to disappear in an instant. However, to play devil’s advocate, politicians should make their vocal talking points about banning handguns and not the “scary” looking assault rifles, considering that handguns are the primary cause of gun deaths each year.

However, I don’t find it plausible to ban all guns or a certain gun type at most. Guns have been a part of this nation’s history for far too long for them to go anywhere.

Rylan Ornelas, Clovis

Local politicians do as they please

We are all guilty.

In Andy Levine’s recent article, ‘Fresno's process to find next police chief proved the skeptics were right,’ Andy writes “I am guilty.” He’s not the only one, though. We are all guilty of allowing politicians license to do as they please rather than what the people have called for.

While communities of colors continued to fear for their safety, we all blindly hoped Mayor Brand would hear the people’s cry for a different type of police chief in the community.

Segregation lines are clear and visible even today in Fresno — lines set in 1873 by white residents who agreed to not sell, rent, or lease to Chinese immigrants, setting into motion the segregation that goes on to this day.

Life expectancy in northern Fresno, arguably the white part of town, is around 90 years of age. Travel a few short miles to the city’s south and southwest communities, arguably the communities of color, and life expectancy is 20 years less on average.

It is no wonder these communities feel as though they are treated as a problem. We are all guilty, and it’s our obligation to continue to vote and to demand change.

Jade Dixon, Fresno

Take a hike, save a bear

I recently read the article about decreasing the speed limit in Yosemite to save bears from getting run over by cars. Though decreasing the speed limit sounds like a good idea, how can one say that cars will actually obey that law.

People’s fear of bears will only encourage them to hit the poor babies instead of slowing down to try and avoid them. I also think that we are in their home; why do we have to bring our cars into their parks? Make a new transportation system by taking a tourist bus or trolley to get from point A to point B. What do people go to the national park for? For hiking and walking around nature! Why not park further from your destination and get those extra steps in on your walking monitor. Not only would it be better for their health, but it would also have the added benefit of helping reduce pollution.

There are so many different ways we can all help to make the bears and us safer, we just have to try!

Sabrina Ramirez, Fresno

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