Letters to the Editor

On Terry Slatic and Fresno schools: Letters to the editor, Aug. 14, 2019

Fresno Unified School Board Trustee Keshia Thomas, center, speaks out against the behavior of Trustee Terry Slatic and in support of censuring Slatic during a discussion of a resolution by the board to censure Slatic, during the school board meeting on Wednesday, August 7, 2019.
Fresno Unified School Board Trustee Keshia Thomas, center, speaks out against the behavior of Trustee Terry Slatic and in support of censuring Slatic during a discussion of a resolution by the board to censure Slatic, during the school board meeting on Wednesday, August 7, 2019. Fresno Bee file

Slatic needs help, should step down

A few months after Terry Slatic was elected to office, headlines detailed his assault on a Bullard High student and harassment of an Army recruiter. He uses threats and intimidation and violated his scope of authority.

It wasn’t until he admonished a cheerleading team in July for speaking out against against a racist and bigoted video posted by a team member on social media that enraged parents and prompted a special board meeting to air their concerns. The school board censured Mr, Slatic.

Where was the outrage for the 15 year old who was assaulted when Slatic tore his back pack off? No charges were filed.

Why didn’t the school board consider censure after the back pack issue?

To the cheerleaders: I hope you can move forward. Learn and grow. That’s your job. Social justice is an important issue. Your voice should always be heard.

To the constituents of district 7: your last two trustees have been a distraction and costly to the district. Get rid of Slatic and elect a trustee with a moral compass.

To Mr. Slatic. Thank you for your service. You need professional help.

Carol Houk, Fresno

Key is keeping girls in school a need

I urge Sens. Harris and Feinstein to support the Keeping Girls in School Act. The goal of this act is to encourage more women to an pursue education.

Women and young girls are stopped from receiving an education due to marriage, pregnancy, or family pressures that force them to uphold traditions. Studies have shown that increasing education for women has lead to economic development, generational trends in education, and fewer maternal and infant deaths. Making women’s education a priority in global development improves a countries infrastructure and increases women’s empowerment as well.

More women seeing that they have the right to the same things as men is something that can be passed down from one generation to the next, showing young girls that they do not have to diminish their goals simply because they are girls.

Malasia Williams, Fresno

Keep your trash to yourself is goal

I am delighted that something is actually going to be done about the blight of our freeways. Now, how do we change the attitude of the people who use these freeways that they should not continue to use it as their personal trash bin? Other cities in California do not, it seams, to have this problem, and certainly not in other states and cities that I have traveled.

Do we need more “do not litter” or “pick up your trash” signs? How about the vehicles that have junk blow out of the back, or the garbage truck that does not have a lid and garbage is strewn on the way to the dump? Just asking.

Diane Woody, Fresno

Congress can fund Alzheimer’s studies

I was amazed when I read about a potential new blood test for Alzheimer’s. In recent years Congress has made funding Alzheimer’s research a priority. Based on this and other findings presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference , this investment is paying off and must continue.

As a caregiver for one of the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s, I’ve seen firsthand how important this research is to improving quality of life of people living with the disease.

A growing public health crisis, someone new develops Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds. As an adult child caregiver, Alzheimer’s has changed the entire landscape of my life — from career to finances and living circumstances. Still, I would never trade the renewed closeness with my parents since I returned to Fresno to help them out.

My family and I appreciate congressman Devin Nunes’ commitment to this cause. Please join me in asking him to support a $350 million increase in Alzheimer’s research funding at the National Institutes of Health in fiscal year 2020. Let’s end Alzheimer’s for good.

Julianne Burk, Fresno

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