Letters to the Editor

Forget Trump, fix roads: Letters to the editor, June 11, 2019

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive on Marine One at the White House on Friday, June 7. President Trump on Monday defended his administration’s decision to threaten a number of trading partners like Mexico with tariffs, calling tariffs a “beautiful thing” and asserting that a trade deal with China was close because of his aggressive policies.
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive on Marine One at the White House on Friday, June 7. President Trump on Monday defended his administration’s decision to threaten a number of trading partners like Mexico with tariffs, calling tariffs a “beautiful thing” and asserting that a trade deal with China was close because of his aggressive policies. NYT

Forget Trump, fix roads and bridges

How long will the people of this great country have to wait before the idiots we send to Washington finally end the Trump = Russia TV show?

America has many problems that need attention, such as infrastructure repair, inequality and health care. Meanwhile both political parties are fighting over which pieces of paper are ripe for revealing the inner workings of the Trump madhouse and lies by his lawyers. We must urge speaker Pelosi to start impeachment proceedings immediately. That will allow the committee legal access to all of Trump’s doings.

The people of other countries must be shaking their heads or laughing at the antics of our government officials as they grope in the darkness for clues. Nothing is being done to fix our more pressing problems, like bridges collapsing and broken roads. Homelessness is increasing and many can’t afford to see a doctor. Democrats in Congress have a chance to meet our problems if they would limit their obsession with an unfit president and his lying bootlickers. They will all be gone after 2020.

David DesRoches, Fresno

Wishing for precious analog TV

I’ve read on the web that the general consensus of this new digital TV for antenna viewers in the rural areas is a bust. I’ve learned it lately too because I now only get about five or six channels in Tulare County, and the programs are the same ones day in and day out or repeats.

When I complained to the FCC that I wanted my old analog TV, they said the reason we only got a few channels was because we probably had a ham radio operator in the area and he or she was jamming our reception when he or she is on the air (which is most of the time).

By the way, I don’t watch that much TV, so cable is out of the question for the two to four hours I watch TV. To make a long story short, I feel America got “you know what” when it lost its analog TV. You can keep digital TV and this so called progress. Give me back my analog any day.

Reggie Cornejo, Porterville

Trying to grasp use of ‘n’ word

I would like to address an issue which, I think, is ignored in the “n” word discussion. Sadly the “n” word is used primarily within the black community. Judging by the music of today, it is even encouraged.

Not long ago, I was in a Lyft vehicle; the driver had a Nipsey Hussle rap song that used the “n” word along with several equally colorful expressions.

I did comment, so he switched to what he referred to as a censored channel. This time the only issue was the “m” word.

If the word is as objectionable as we say, then why is it used in everyday speech by the very population who view it as a degrading and unacceptable slight? I ask this question in all sincerity.

David McElroy, Visalia

Forgo superstition for modern science

“When you believe in things you don’t understand, you suffer. Superstition ain’t the way.” — Stevie Wonder

For tens of thousands of years, superstition was an inefficient but useful way for humans to stay alive. Over time different groups of people came up with their own explanations for why things happened that made sense to them. These became superstitions.

Over millennia, superstitions were propagated and became “the truth” for their believers. But different beliefs were only true to their believers.

The scientific method is the most reliable path to truth ever invented. It’s a light that reveals superstitions for what they are: false.

Today we are on the brink of a new age of scientific exploration and discovery. We are also at the brink of a planetary societal collapse brought on by climate change, overpopulation, and the wars of ignorance between believers of competing superstitions. The anti-science war waged by the leaders of ignorance will doom us all if we don’t stand up and fight for truth. I beg you to let go of your ignorance and superstition. It makes us all suffer. There’s a way to overcome the challenges of the future, and superstition ain’t it.

Matthew T. McLaughlin, Fresno

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