Letters to the Editor

Climate change: Letters to the editor, May 4, 2019

President Donald Trump walks with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., at the U.S. Capitol in Washington in May 2018. Barrasso, who is from uranium-rich Wyoming, has introduced a bill to promote nuclear power that he frames as a climate solution. Driven partly by polls showing voters in both parties — particularly younger ones — are worried about a warming planet, some lawmakers are changing how they talk about climate change.
President Donald Trump walks with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., at the U.S. Capitol in Washington in May 2018. Barrasso, who is from uranium-rich Wyoming, has introduced a bill to promote nuclear power that he frames as a climate solution. Driven partly by polls showing voters in both parties — particularly younger ones — are worried about a warming planet, some lawmakers are changing how they talk about climate change. NYT

Climate change and democracy

George Burman (Valley Voices, April 27) elucidated frightening consequences of climate change, likening human civilization to the crew of the Titanic in its denial and inaction. Bottom line: global warming is real, it’s bad, and we caused it, by spewing billions of tons of greenhouse gases into Earth’s atmosphere.

Yet we may avoid catastrophe if we take action immediately. We must insist that our elected representatives support HR 763, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act. This revenue-neutral bill puts a gradually increasing fee on carbon at the source, returning the proceeds to American families as a dividend while reducing America’s emissions by 40%.

But that’s not all. Global warming has been understood since the 1970s, but the fossil fuel industry has waged a massive, unrelenting campaign of lobbying, donations, and outright lying to keep Americans from accepting the facts. To counter that, we must also support HJR 48, the “We the People Amendment,” which will establish that (1) corporations are not persons entitled to constitutional rights and (2) money is not speech and can be regulated in elections. We must take back our democracy from the monied interests in order to tackle climate change and other problems we face.

Robert Pethoud, Fresno

Support proposed carbon dividend

George Burman summarized the effects of climate change quite accurately in his Valley Voice last Saturday. There is an important information, however, that needs to be added.

A bipartisan solution, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, (H.R. 763) was introduced into Congress in January and has been steadily gaining co-sponsors as well as support from major institutions. This policy will reduce America’s emissions by at least 40% in the first 12 years. The fees collected on carbon emissions will be allocated to all Americans to spend any way they choose. The government will not keep any of the fees collected. This bill needs your support.

Patricia Reeves, Fresno

Early childhood learning critical

In the El Dorado neighborhood beside Fresno State lies a small gated preschool run by Stone Soup Fresno. Stone Soup Fresno offers preschool education to low-income families, especially those of Southeast Asian descent. It is here where you will find colorful classrooms, enthusiastic teachers and vibrant children. As a volunteer with this nonprofit preschool, I have learned a great deal about the positive impact it makes on the students’ lives.

Despite the preschool having such an amazing attitude, they struggle to voice the importance of early childhood education to the local community. I want to highlight this as an issue because early childhood education is important in establishing basic fundamental skills for young children. During my volunteer service, I have witnessed the positive impact of this education on the students. I was able to see the students grow over the year. My hope is that Fresno becomes more aware of the positive impacts of early education and be aware of affordable options for low-income families.

Luna Lovelace, Clovis

Want a dog? Think for a moment

Recently I have come across many people giving away their dogs because their dogs don't listen to them or that they destroy everything. I think people forget when looking for a dog it is not just about looks, it also needs to be about personality and temperament.

I find that many people just pick the dog because its cute, but people should ask themselves before choosing the dog, will it fit my lifestyle.

Also, I find that too many people do not want to put in work to train their dog. They just expect the dog to know not to jump on people or not to chew on things. Training your dog is a way for people to have the behavior that they want.

Simply, what I am trying to say is, when people think about getting a dog, they need to think about what goes into having a dog.

Julia Villane, Fresno

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