Letters to the Editor

Faith leaders and climate change: Letters to the editor, May 2, 2019

An Extinction Rebellion climate change protester holds a placard near the Bank of England, in London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. Extinction Rebellion disrupted the British capital for 10 days, seeking negotiations with the government on its demand to make slowing climate change a top priority.
An Extinction Rebellion climate change protester holds a placard near the Bank of England, in London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. Extinction Rebellion disrupted the British capital for 10 days, seeking negotiations with the government on its demand to make slowing climate change a top priority. AP

Religious leaders and climate change

This is a plea to Valley religious leaders and their faith communities. I believe religious leaders try to be good stewards to their congregations and good stewards for all of God's beautiful creation. Air pollution in our Valley worsens conditions for all of us, but especially for the children and the elderly. Our rates of asthma, Valley fever and COPD are already high and the worsening wildfires exacerbated by climate change will make it worse.

Religious leaders are in a position to raise awareness and encourage steps to improve the situation. Letters and phone calls to members of Congress can lead to action. People also can join and help environmental organizations. I belong to Citizens’ Climate Lobby Fresno, which has chapters all across the United States.

We are excited that we have a bipartisan-supported bill in Congress, HR 763. If passed it will create jobs and reduce carbon pollution.

To be good stewards, I hope religious leaders and faith-based communities will take bold steps to protect our valley, God’s creation, and all life on earth.

Andrea Boone, Fresno

Not-so-pretend PG&E letter

Hi! Let’s call me Bob. I have a monopoly on California utility service.

Because of my reticence to perform necessary maintenance ( I hate wasting money) some of my equipment got “kinda messed up.” Yes, I know that’s a very technical term and I doubt any of my “customers” are capable of understanding it. But here’s the thing; my equipment started some really deadly and awful wildfires.

So now, I have to go to the California politicians and ask for a huge increase in rates so I can bank a few billion dollars to pay for unfortunate incidents like this. Plus, I need to attract some major investors so I can make even more. Because let’s be honest, what matters more? Money? Or people’s lives and homes? That’s funny! Obviously it’s money.

So I will get my rate increases (I have never been turned down) and my profits will go up 60%. That seems fair, and I do not give a rat’s tail about whiners losing their homes and lives.

So thanks suckers, you got what you deserved. Keep that extinguisher handy, ok?

Love,

PG&E

Randy Sacks, Coarsegold

Pink Cow Thrift worth support

As a volunteer, I have seen firsthand how Wesley United Methodist helps those less fortunate in our community in a number of ways, including through their Pink Cow Thrift Shop and their food pantry. Wesley does so much for the community, but they have limited resources and need the public’s support.

Fresno ranks number two in the nation of cities with the highest rate of extreme poverty. Wesley needs help in fighting against poverty. They could really use the extra help and donations for their Pink Cow Thrift Shop, where community members can buy items they need for a fraction of the cost they would normally pay if the items were purchased new.

Poverty and hunger often go hand-in-hand. According to California Food Policy Advocates, over 30% of the Fresno’s population suffers from food insecurity. The Food Pantry at Wesley is doing its part in decreasing those numbers in the Dorado Park neighborhood. With the help of public donations, Wesley can provide more food and make a difference to those Fresnans in need of assistance.

Lizbeth Cortez Villa, Dos Palos

Hanford suffers public-safety needs

The Hanford City Council spent $96,000 on a park survey so I challenged them to spend the same amount for a study to determine if our manpower in public safety (police and fire) is up to par. I’m pretty sure it fell on deaf ears.

We have four officers on school duty nine months out of the year and I think we should count only 25% of them in our count of officers (all four should be counted as one). The police chief says the marijuana companies will require officers to control them; he says those companies will pay us for them but it’s going to be a strain on our department for sure.

We build a new fire station and I’d like to see what a study would tell us about how many firefighters we should have at each station. Three of the guys going to the academy didn’t finish, hopefully three others will. In June of 2016 Russ Curry suggested hiring one new fireman that year and one the next year, all five members (Mendes, Pannett, Ayers, Ramirez and Curry) agreed, it was never done.

I honestly think we need more cops and more firefighters.

Skip Athey, Hanford

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