Letters to the Editor

21 Savage case: Letters to the editor, March 20, 2019

21 Savage poses in the press room at the MTV Video Music Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York. On Friday, March 8, 2019, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that a week after the Liberty County District Attorney’s office rejected a felony case against the Atlanta rapper for a contract dispute regarding a 2016 performance, the club promoter has re-filed it as a civil case in Fulton County, where the artist lives.
21 Savage poses in the press room at the MTV Video Music Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York. On Friday, March 8, 2019, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that a week after the Liberty County District Attorney’s office rejected a felony case against the Atlanta rapper for a contract dispute regarding a 2016 performance, the club promoter has re-filed it as a civil case in Fulton County, where the artist lives. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

21 Savage does good for others

On February 3, 2019, 21 Savage was taken into custody by ICE agents in the Atlanta area. He was arrested on the claims that the rapper came to the U.S. legally in 2005, but overstayed his visa that expired in 2006.

Many people think it is because he had just released music with lyrics where he criticizes immigration. He was released on bond nine days after his detention, but his case is not resolved. It is expected to take two years for the case to be resolved.

21 Savage should be able to become a U.S. citizen because of all the good work he has done here. He has done charity work with police, has done school events, and has donated a lot of money to different organizations. His mother and four siblings are citizens or permanent residents. He has three children who are U.S. citizens. He should not be forced to leave this country when his family and work is all here.

Caleb Delgado, Caruthers

Border wall is simply a waste

The U.S. is a far cry from Constantinople. Immigrants are not attacking us. Immigrants are not “invading” us. Immigrants are coming to our country to live a better life. The Muslims and Christians were engaged in a holy war; Immigrants want to join our society. This anti-immigrant narrative must stop.

Immigrants founded this country, and immigrants continue to make great contributions to our nation and economy. Our farms employ mainly immigrant workers to harvest our produce. They are part of our communities.

A wall at the southern border would be costly, contrary to what Mr. Lee thinks. Most estimations for the wall average around $70 billion. And the wall is easily defeated. It can be climbed over, or dug under, or chipped through. There is a lot of southern border, and we haven’t even talked about the maintenance costs of such a structure.

Manpower and technology are the ways to combat illegal immigration. Programs such as e-verify have been proven to work in curbing illegal immigration. More border agents could be hired to patrol. New technologies, such as drones, could be used to aid in monitoring the border. A wall will be a waste, plain and simple.

Jessie A. Gumanab, Fresno

Liberal agrees with Victor Hanson

What a rare occasion for a liberal to be able to agree with Victor Davis Hanson!

He correctly chides us (The Bee, March 17) for attempting the erasure of history when he says, “The past is not a melodrama, but more often a tragedy. Destroying history will not make you feel good about the present. Studying and learning from it might.”

Doesn’t it occur to us that some future will judge us as we judge the past, not by the standards of their time but of our own so-called enlightenment? That enlightenment evolves from the ignorance and inexperience of youth through exposure to other cultures and history. May we ever continue to learn and act accordingly.

Ruth Gadebusch, Fresno

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