Letters to the Editor

Border wall: Letters to the editor, March 11, 2019

Migrants are escorted by a U.S. Border Patrol agent as they are detained after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, to San Ysidro last December. The Trump administration’s effort to make asylum seekers wait in Mexico explicitly targets Spanish-speakers and people from Latin America, according to internal guidelines of a highly touted strategy to address the burgeoning number of Central Americans arriving at U.S. borders.
Migrants are escorted by a U.S. Border Patrol agent as they are detained after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, to San Ysidro last December. The Trump administration’s effort to make asylum seekers wait in Mexico explicitly targets Spanish-speakers and people from Latin America, according to internal guidelines of a highly touted strategy to address the burgeoning number of Central Americans arriving at U.S. borders. AP file

Take down the wall around your home?

I’m wondering: Would all those who are so against a wall/fence of some kind on our southern border be willing to take down any wall/fence they may have around their own personal residence so that anyone could wander in “at will” and do “whatever” on their property — and ask to be fed, clothed, housed, and medicated by that home owner?

Why should we do that with our country?

L.R. Gill, Clovis

Walled cities used to be commonplace

Walls are not immoral. Biblical science has shown that before Jesus, and during Jesus’ times, there were hundreds of cities with walls. During those turbulent times, walled cities were not built for impressive purposes, they were built for survival —to keep out invaders, bandits, and to hide from the Roman soldiers who’s aim was to destroy Christianity.

During Jesus public ministry, Jesus was constantly in hiding and protected by his apostles in walled cities, to avoid being captured.

There is absolute nothing in the Bible that Jesus Christ condemned walls or walled cities as being immoral. Total lie, by the leftist-socialist parties.

Manuel Madrid, Reedley

Teleconferencing speech therapy makes sense

When I was a director of personnel for a school district in Connecticut two decades ago, I dreaded the news that a speech therapist was retiring or leaving, because I knew how difficult it would be to replace that professional. As your story on Fresno Unified contracting to use speech therapy via video conferencing indicates, it has not gotten any easier.

While concerns are legitimate about this mode of teaching for all children, teleconferencing in terms of psychological and psychiatric services has been in place in the Fresno County Department of Behavioral Health as well as in medical facilities in the area for some time. In a region like ours, where specialists are in short supply and transportation can be a serious problem for some clients, it can be a positive intervention and option.

It may not be for everyone, but young people seem to take to it best since they have grown up in the computer age. After blinking twice, I probably would have jumped at the chance to try it in times of shortage. The school district should be congratulated for taking a proactive stance so long as appropriate monitoring and evaluation is in place.

Francine M. Farber, Fresno

Current issues reveal hypocrisy

Just wondering how those anti-death-penalty folks feel about illegal immigration and abortion/infanticide. They argue that the death penalty is immoral because there’s the possibility someone innocent might die. They state that even if only one innocent person dies, that’s too many.

My guess is they’re disingenuous when it comes to life because most of them support the killing of babies and allowing more than one illegal alien criminal into our country who will take an innocent life. That doesn’t square up unless you consider where they’re coming from — misguided, Godless hatred.

Brian Murray, Auberry

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