Letters to the Editor

Trump wrong on Saudis: Letters to the editor, Dec. 5, 2018

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, center top, watches President Donald Trump, right, walk past as Brazil's President Michel Temer, left, stands by while leaders gather for the group photo at the start of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018.
Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, center top, watches President Donald Trump, right, walk past as Brazil's President Michel Temer, left, stands by while leaders gather for the group photo at the start of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. AP file

Trump thanking Saudis was wrong

I am searching for the right words to express my outrage and embarrassment. The president of the United States thanked Saudi Arabia for lowering our gas prices. He also gave them a pass on the heinous murder of Jamal Khashoggi, a U.S.-based columnist. I would say his moral compass is broken, but at this point I don’t believe he has one.

A few cents at the pump is not worth selling the soul of our nation. This is certainly not making America great again. If it is, I want the old America back.

Let’s hear from our elected officials loud and clear —this is not acceptable. Let’s hear from everyone!

Lynda Daley, Fresno

Me Too must reflect all women

Although #MeToo has empowered countless women survivors, its global presence may have skewed its original mission to empower women of color.

Many of (Harvey) Weinstein’s accusers were “famous and white,” as actress Jane Fonda phrased it in a 2017 interview on MSNBC’s “All In With Chris Hayes” (Chen, 2018, par. 2). Perhaps the most famous case of sexual assault allegations following the Weinstein scandal is Dr. Christine Ford’s case against then Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. Again, there is no doubt that #MeToo has been a powerful tool in giving a voice to the seemingly voiceless. However, its two most publicized cases have centered mostly around accusations made by white women.

In order to avoid compromising the foundation and integrity of Tarana Burke’s original movement, it is absolutely crucial that #MeToo supporters embrace and acknowledge the validity of every survivor’s story, especially women of color. #MeToo must move society toward a womanist approach in which “all sites and forms of oppression, whether they are based on social-address categories like gender, race, or class, [are elevated] to a level of equal concern and action,” (Phillips, 2006, p. xxi). Only then can we truly uncover the meaning of Me Too.

Victoria Cisneros, Fowler

On forests, Trump was mistaken

You say that you believe Trump that our governor is responsible for forest mismanagement (Valley Voice by Joe Denham, Nov. 17). May I suggest that you read “all” of the paper rather than the pieces that appeal to your politics. The Bee, and many other state papers, some national papers, and a great deal of the national news reported that the federal government manages 57 percent of the state’s forests; 39 percent is owned and managed by private owners, and only 2 percent is managed by the state.

Unless you are suggesting California pick up the tab from the federal government, and start paying private owners a subsidy to manage their trees, please inform yourself before agreeing with the ignorance trolling out of the White House ... or perhaps pick up a rake.

Jeff Hodge, Fresno

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