Letters to the Editor

Salty water problem | Letters to the editor, Nov. 21, 2018

Land sank so much along the Delta-Mendota Canal that this bridge near Russell and Althea avenues in northwest Fresno County, once well above the water, now nearly touches it. Land subsidence is caused by massive groundwater pumping.
Land sank so much along the Delta-Mendota Canal that this bridge near Russell and Althea avenues in northwest Fresno County, once well above the water, now nearly touches it. Land subsidence is caused by massive groundwater pumping.

Salty water delivery a problem

I was not surprised by the failure of the water bond. The federal Delta-Mendota Canal plus the state CA aquifer, at current pumping rates, bring into the western Valley the equivalent of about 40 boxcars of salt every day. This amount appears in “Salinity in the Central Valley” by the Water Education Foundation. I do not think the same people (mainly the federal Bureau of Reclamation) who gave us brackish water via the DMC should get a “penny” of bond money until they acknowledge in print the salty downside of their previous work.

Anthony H. Horan, Fresno

Unfair case of sex offender

Being an American, I care about justice; justice in general, but in today’s case, it is justice of a particular brand.

The Bee published an article about the men in the Coalinga State Hospital. It is a facility specifically built for sex offenders. I have a friend there. His name is Jeremy. Jeremy had child porn on his computer, and he was arrested and sentenced to a year in jail. He did not rape, molest, bother or touch in a sexual way.

A year in jail seems fair. But, that was 2013, and he’s still in prison. The law says you have to serve your sentence, and then you get out, unless it is a “sex offense.” How is that defined?

Just recently The Bee ran a story about a man stalking a 14-year old girl, ready and willing to have sex with her. The girl’s father intervened, and the man was arrested. His actions were way worse than Jeremy’s, yet he will be serving less than a year!

Jeremy has no money for a lawyer, and his public defender is overworked and less than motivated. How do we get justice? Jeremy is completing his sex offender treatment program classes, but it is a slow process. He wants out. He wants to be normal. He wants a job and a home. Are years in prison going to help him when he gets out? No. Does anyone benefit from his extended sentence? No. Is this logical in any way or justice in any form? I argue no. It makes no sense. Where does he appeal?

He is periodically (but not often) evaluated by psychologists who benefit from his incarceration. They are paid by the state, and the more patients they have, the more they get paid. It is a clear conflict of interest.

Alan Langstraat, Selma

Teaching on ‘secret war’ sorely needed

As I was growing up, I was ignorant toward the hardship of the Hmong community. The schools that I attended did not associate the secret war, a war where U.S. soldiers and the Hmong united together in order to fight against North Vietnam, in history classes. I didn’t find it important or how greatly it affected my family.

As I grew older, I realized the devastating truth and wished that I wasn’t a clueless child. I find it important to have schools teach the secret war more in depth to the new generation, so everyone can understand how the Hmong community came to be in America.

Schools discuss Pearl Harbor and cruel treatment to Japanese Americans, and the Holocaust where there was a genocide of the Jewish people. If schools can discuss these important and cruel events, why can’t they teach about the secret war and the Hmong genocide? As someone who is Hmong, I want the younger Hmong generation to understand their families’ hardship, knowing that it is important and not something stuck in the past. It will also help other students expand their knowledge.

Like the saying goes, “Knowledge is the key for success.”

Nicole Vang, Sanger

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