Letters to the Editor

Nike and Kaepernick | Letters to the editor, Sept. 12, 2018

People walk by a Nike advertisement featuring Colin Kaepernick on display, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, in New York. Nike unveiled the deal with the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback, who’s known for starting protests among NFL players over police brutality and racial inequality.
People walk by a Nike advertisement featuring Colin Kaepernick on display, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018, in New York. Nike unveiled the deal with the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback, who’s known for starting protests among NFL players over police brutality and racial inequality. AP

Nike a loser in this marketing game

I tried several times to call the Nike Corp. to express my opinion on their hiring of a man who lauds Castro, cop killers, has disdain for veterans, and feels oppressed in a country that has allowed him to earn an extraordinary amount of wealth playing a game. Once through to the Nike operator I was transferred to a line where a representative would take my call. At that point the taped message informed me that the line was busy, thanked me for calling and disconnected the call. No chance to share my concerns. This all happened before 8 a.m. last Tuesday morning and they open their office at 7:30. Hopefully a Fresno Bee reader is also an employee of Nike and will pass on my message, “If it has a Nike swoosh on it; I won’t buy it.” Nike means victory in the Greek language. The Nike Corp. seems to have snatched defeat from the jaws of victory.

Bill Atwood, Bass Lake

Black-on-black violence the issue

Ron Manfredi states “a vast majority of police officers are fair (and) hard-working” but some are poorly trained. He implies that the few poorly trained officers are responsible for avoidable black suspect deaths. If all that be true then police bias against black males can’t be said to be “institutionalized” in America as he asserts. In fact a recent study of 10 large American cities by a black economist from Harvard indicated that cops were more likely to shoot at white than black suspects under similar circumstances.

Those of us old enough to remember when racism was real and ugly in America are not “hate-filled denigraters.” We simply find it hard to square (Colin) Kaepernick’s opinions about institutional racial injustice with the emergence, growth, and acceptance of black people in business and the professions. We see black actors, athletes, sports and news commentators as accepted and, in many instances, admired fixtures of American life. The real “institutionalized violence against African-American males” is endemic to the black ghetto and is black on black. Kaepernick, BLM, and liberals like Manfredi need to eschew the inflammatory rhetoric and address the pathology of the black ghetto if they are serious about solving racial inequality.

Michael Freeman, Sanger

When to go to bed, then start school

In regard to Taryn Luna, “Later start times for schools in California gain steam in Legislature” published Aug. 25: She makes claims of the controversial arguments possessed on starting middle and high schools at a later time. In agreement of Sen. Anthony Portantino, bringing back the proposal and stating the facts and evidence of the bill being passed. Simply refers to research conducted by the University of Minnesota, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, stated, “Later start times improves student health.” It’s proven that as growing individuals we need a certain amount of sleep to enhance our daily activities, especially with learning for seven to eight hours a day.

In disagreement of the passing bill, O’Donnell, a former middle and high school teacher . Claims that kids should be set an earlier bedtime. Many red flags are risen due to this statement. You don’t know what these kids’ lives are like. There are millions of kids out there with different situations and by changing their bedtime might not be as easy as O’Donnell refers it to be.

Amelia Vitale, Fresno

A start for health care for all

I write in response to your piece (Sept. 4) on proposed legislation on the matter of medical insurance awaiting the governor’s signature – or veto. First, “health care” is a chimera. The term actually covers two separate issues: one is medical care and the other is medical insurance. With respect to medical care, the USA ranks as fair-to-poor among the “developed nations” of the world. With respect to medical insurance, the U.S. ranks far behind the “developed nations.” In other “developed nations” it is accepted that the duties of the government to its citizens include access to medical care. This requires some form of universal medical insurance. In the U.S., it is held that medical insurance is a privilege and must be earned and paid for. Therefore, outside (and even within) the remit of Medicare, Medicaid and the VA, any episode of serious illness or injury is likely to result in personal bankruptcy. Furthermore, the cost of medical care in the U.S. is far higher than anywhere else. I, therefore urge the passage of the proposed legislation to regulate the conduct of medical insurance companies, if only as a first step to achieving medical insurance for all.

Michael G. Marre, Fresno

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