Sales associate Mike Conway, right, shows Paul Angulo a pistol at Bullseye Sport gun shop in Riverside. The massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a mentally disturbed young man killed 26 children and teachers, galvanized calls across the nation for tighter gun controls. But in the years since, many states have moved in the opposite direction, embracing the National Rifle Association’s response that more “good guys with guns” are what’s needed to limit the carnage of mass shootings.
Sales associate Mike Conway, right, shows Paul Angulo a pistol at Bullseye Sport gun shop in Riverside. The massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a mentally disturbed young man killed 26 children and teachers, galvanized calls across the nation for tighter gun controls. But in the years since, many states have moved in the opposite direction, embracing the National Rifle Association’s response that more “good guys with guns” are what’s needed to limit the carnage of mass shootings. JAE C. HONG AP File/2015
Sales associate Mike Conway, right, shows Paul Angulo a pistol at Bullseye Sport gun shop in Riverside. The massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a mentally disturbed young man killed 26 children and teachers, galvanized calls across the nation for tighter gun controls. But in the years since, many states have moved in the opposite direction, embracing the National Rifle Association’s response that more “good guys with guns” are what’s needed to limit the carnage of mass shootings. JAE C. HONG AP File/2015

Gun control will always be influenced by money in politics

October 20, 2017 10:22 AM