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Hundreds gather to remember Edward Lund’s ‘life lived in moments’

Edward Lund, in a 2008 event, talks about a table of mementos saved by William Saroyan. Overhead is the author’s old Raleigh bicycle.
Edward Lund, in a 2008 event, talks about a table of mementos saved by William Saroyan. Overhead is the author’s old Raleigh bicycle. jwalker@fresnobee.com

Nearly 400 people of all walks of life – from politicians to poets – packed the John Wright Theater at Fresno State on Saturday for the memorial service of Edward Odd Lund III, an artist who wore many hats during his 54-year life.

Lund died Oct. 3 after a bicycle crash during a charity ride in Sonoma County.

Clovis Mayor Nathan Magsig, a friend and fellow cyclist, orchestrated the memorial proceedings, which involved music, dance and testimony from Lund’s family and many friends.

“Ed was good at a lot of things,” Magsig said. “He was graceful on a bike, and he was graceful with people.”

Another cyclist, Matt Dearing, said he thought of Lund as an uncle he admired and tried to emulate.

“Life is lived in moments, not minutes, and Ed was like that,” he said.

Attorney Bob Koligian spoke at length on behalf of Lund’s family. He described Lund’s many talents: The artist was also a curator and teacher for Fresno State and other local galleries, as well as a dancer, rock climber and chef.

The memorial reached its emotional zenith when Koligian spoke, on behalf of Lund, to the two young girls who were most important to Lund: stepdaughter Grace and niece Emma.

Koligian told them that Lund never forgot the child inside of him and always lived in the moment, and he asked them to do the same as they grow up.

Emma and Grace also took to the stage to read a passage in honor of Lund.

Magsig then opened up the theater to anyone wanting to speak off-the-cuff about Lund. Former interns, past colleagues and longtime friends held back the tears as best they could to share stories about Lund, who was more than once referred to as a “Renaissance man.”

After the memorial, much of the crowd walked across campus to the Phoebe Conley Art Gallery, where Lund’s art, bicycles and mementos were displayed.

The gallery will remain open until Oct. 24.

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