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Fresno State recalls butter for potential bacteria contamination

Fresno State’s creamery issued a voluntary recall on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, for 15-ounce tubs of butter spread because of possible listeria monocytogenes bacteria contamination. About 40 tubs with the product code 249 and sell-by dates of 02/01/20 or 08/01/20 on the back label were sold through the university’s Gibson Farm Market.
Fresno State’s creamery issued a voluntary recall on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, for 15-ounce tubs of butter spread because of possible listeria monocytogenes bacteria contamination. About 40 tubs with the product code 249 and sell-by dates of 02/01/20 or 08/01/20 on the back label were sold through the university’s Gibson Farm Market. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FRESNO

Butter produced by the Fresno State Creamery and sold mostly through the university’s Gibson Farm Market is being voluntarily recalled because of possible contamination of a bacteria called listeria monocytogenes.

The recall includes 15-ounce tubs of the “regular” butter spread stamped with the product code 249 and a sell-by date of either “02/01/20” or “08/01/20,” the university reported Wednesday afternoon. Forty containers of the butter were sold at the farm market at the college, and one additional tub was sold at another site.

The university is asking customers who bought the butter product at the Gibson Farm Market to return products with the affected code and sell-by states to the store for a refund. So far, no illness have been reported from consuming the product, but the creamery is recalling the butter voluntarily as a precaution.

The creamery is inspected by the state Department of Food and Agriculture’s milk and dairy food safety branch.

No other Fresno State Creamery products are affected by the recall.

Listeria monocytogenes causes an illness called listeriosis. Symptoms include a high temperature, aches and pains, chills, vomiting and diarrhea.

A statement by the university urges customers who feel sick after eating the butter – especially pregnant women, seniors over 65, or people with weakened immune systems – to seek medical care and tell their doctor about possibly eating contaminated food.

Customers with questions may call Michael Thomas, interim dean of the university’s Jordan School of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, at 559-278-2061 during weekday business hours.

Tim Sheehan: 559-441-6319, @TimSheehanNews

Lifelong Valley resident Tim Sheehan has worked in the Valley as a reporter and editor since 1986, and has been at The Fresno Bee since 1998. He is currently The Bee’s data reporter and covers California’s high-speed rail project and other transportation issues. He grew up in Madera, has a journalism degree from Fresno State and a master’s degree in leadership studies from Fresno Pacific University.
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