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Are tiny homes the answer for affordable housing? Clovis is giving it a try

Old Town Clovis’ small homes have all you need

The Old Town Clovis cottage program is designed to infill small homes of around 500 square feet in areas of the city's downtown core by providing incentives to property owners.
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The Old Town Clovis cottage program is designed to infill small homes of around 500 square feet in areas of the city's downtown core by providing incentives to property owners.

If you want help building a tiny home, or what’s called a cottage, the city of Clovis can offer help.

The city is expanding its Old Town cottage home program to the rest of the city for properties that qualify.

As part of the program, the city provides, for free, a choice of three building plans — saving the homeowner nearly $10,000. The homes vary in square footage from 374 to 498. The program was launched in Old Town in 2017 to address affordable housing needs. Since then 10 cottages have been built and another one currently is under construction.

To qualify, your property must be located in the Clovis city limits and zoned single-family residential with alley access, utility access and space for one parking space.

The cottages cost anywhere from $60,000 to $100,000 to build, depending on the materials used.

The city added another new incentive this month: Self-Help Enterprises will provide financing to eligible property owners.

“We are thrilled that the city of Clovis is now able to provide property owners throughout Clovis with the opportunity to take advantage of this unique affordable housing program,” said Dwight Kroll, the Clovis director of planning and development services. “By expanding outside of Old Town we are essentially doubling the number of properties on which cottage homes can be built.”

For more information, visit www.cloviscottagehomes.com.

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Brianna Calix covers Fresno’s city government for The Bee, where she works to hold public officials accountable, analyze city policy and inform readers how city hall decisions might affect their lives. She previously worked for The Bee’s sister paper, the Merced Sun-Star.
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