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People love giant burritos, and this Fresno restaurant is cashing in

You can get this giant burrito at a Central Fresno taqueria

Edwin Espinoza of Taqueria Yarelis invented the monster-sized Anaconda burrito. He said he's sold over 1,000 of them so far this week after a video of him making one went viral.
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Edwin Espinoza of Taqueria Yarelis invented the monster-sized Anaconda burrito. He said he's sold over 1,000 of them so far this week after a video of him making one went viral.

A Fresno taqueria is making a name for itself with a burrito gigante – the Anaconda – that is luring customers from all over.

The tortilla missile is about 3 feet long and weighs more than most newborn babies – and customers could be seen cradling it as they left Taqueria Yarelis in central Fresno.

After a social media posting went viral this week, Edwin Espinoza and his father were swamped with Anaconda orders – 1,000 in three days.

“We ran out of meat two days in a row,” Espinoza said, “200 pounds of asada. We had to call our supplier.”

The walk-up restaurant on Fresno Street near Belmont Avenue owes this massive spike in business to a single Facebook video. It was posted on the restaurant’s Facebook page Monday night and had racked up more than 16 million views as of Friday afternoon. More than 219,000 people have shared it, and the post has racked up more than 53,000 comments.

Espinoza, who runs the small restaurant with his family, said he concocted the burrito while working on party trays for a catering order. He first tried it with four extra-large tortillas, stuffed with the works: beans, cheese, meat, cabbage, onions, sour cream, guacamole and two kinds of salsa. The second try upped the length to five tortillas, which stuck. The massive burrito is cut in half, as it would not fit on the restaurant’s grill otherwise, and grilled shut. You can also get wet Anaconda burritos, which are covered in sauce and baked in the oven.

The Anaconda costs $23 plus tax and feeds five adults or 10 children.

The video shows Espinoza carefully constructing the behemoth for a silent 5 1/2 minutes. He knew his restaurant had a decent Facebook following, so he expected it to do well.

But not this well.

“We’re going to be busy this weekend,” he said. “People from San Diego, Los Angeles – all across California are coming for one.”

Right now, only Espinoza and his father know how to make it. But they’re working on converting another cook into a culinary snake charmer.

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