Fresno Beehive

It’s the true end of an era as ‘Car Talk’ counts its final days

Brothers Tom Magliozzi, left, and Ray Magliozzi, hosts of National Public Radio's "Car Talk" show, pose together in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday, June 19, 2008. NPR will stop airing the show Sept. 30, 2017.
Brothers Tom Magliozzi, left, and Ray Magliozzi, hosts of National Public Radio's "Car Talk" show, pose together in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday, June 19, 2008. NPR will stop airing the show Sept. 30, 2017. AP

If you’ve read or heard anything about the Click and Clack guys in the last few days, it’s likely because their NPR car-repair life-advice call in radio show “Car Talk” is going off air in many markets this weekend.

Like, forever.

Technically, brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi went into retirement in 2012, though they continued to release episodes of the show. When Tom Magliozzi died in 2014, the show was re-branded as “Best of Car Talk,” with new intros (voiced by Ray) and old unaired calls that had been pulled from the vaults, some going from as far back as the 1980’s. Eventually, those archives ran dry and NPR announced the show would be coming to an end, officially in 2017.

Which brings us here.

Technically, the show will be available to NPR stations until Sept. 30, but many have already chosen to stop airing the show. Locally, Valley Public Radio (KVPR) hasn’t aired the show since Jan. 1.

“We chose to make the move earlier, so we could start the new year with a fresh program,” says Joe Moore, the station’s Director of Program Content. The time slot (10 a.m. Saturdays ) has been filled by Ira Glass’ “This American Life.” The new addition has gotten such good response, the stations also air a rebroadcast 7 p.m. Wednesdays.

Fans of the “Best of Car Talk” will still be able to get weekly podcasts of the 30-year series after Sept. 30. And you can still donate your old car, too.

Joshua Tehee: 559-441-6479, @joshuatehee

  Comments