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Clovis West senior Adrian Martinez has a problem many others would love to have 1:08

Clovis West senior Adrian Martinez has a problem many others would love to have

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  • San Joaquin Valley farmers keep drilling, even as groundwater limits loom

    Two years after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to limit groundwater pumping, new wells are going in faster and deeper than ever in the San Joaquin Valley farm belt. Farmers say they have no choice given cuts in surface water deliveries. But the drilling has exacted a substantial human cost in some of California’s poorest rural communities.

Two years after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to limit groundwater pumping, new wells are going in faster and deeper than ever in the San Joaquin Valley farm belt. Farmers say they have no choice given cuts in surface water deliveries. But the drilling has exacted a substantial human cost in some of California’s poorest rural communities. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee
Two years after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill designed to limit groundwater pumping, new wells are going in faster and deeper than ever in the San Joaquin Valley farm belt. Farmers say they have no choice given cuts in surface water deliveries. But the drilling has exacted a substantial human cost in some of California’s poorest rural communities. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee

Farmers say, ‘No apologies,’ as well drilling hits record levels in San Joaquin Valley

September 25, 2016 04:00 AM

UPDATED September 27, 2016 11:26 AM

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  • Farmers use peak river flows to recharge groundwater, fight drought

    Grower Don Cameron explains how flooding fields will replace drip irrigation and help restore the flood plain to its natural state. It is one of the way California farmers are trying to plan for future drought conditions. Cameron was named farmer of the year by the Fresno Chamber of Commerce Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017.