Letters to the Editor

Democrats and the border: Letters to the editor, July 22, 2019

In this April 30, 2019 photo, migrants seeking asylum in the United States line up for a meal provided by volunteers near the international bridge in Matamoros, Mexico. The U.S. government will expand its policy requiring asylum seekers to wait outside the country in one of Mexico's most dangerous cities.
In this April 30, 2019 photo, migrants seeking asylum in the United States line up for a meal provided by volunteers near the international bridge in Matamoros, Mexico. The U.S. government will expand its policy requiring asylum seekers to wait outside the country in one of Mexico's most dangerous cities. AP file

Can’t blame Dems for the border

James Spitze (Letters to the editor, July 12) wrongly claims that Democratic members of the House “specifically excluded any funding for additional beds” for those being housed on the southern border. House Democrats in reality voted specifically against increased funding for the American gestapo, or ICE! The private companies in charge of those detention centers receive $700 per day for each individual held. They are spending approximately one-tenth of that and pocketing the rest.

Mr. Spitze is also wrong in his claim that the Democrats are responsible for manufacturing the crisis at the border. This is a typical trait of the Republican cult, whereby they manufacture situations, and then try to blame someone else for the mess. Unfortunately, the new dilitanti live in an echo chamber, where they only hear themselves and their manufactured skullduggery.

Timothy McKeever, Fresno

Homeless people and politicians

Regarding problems of the so-called homeless, it seems to me that everyone is always trying to throw money at the situation to try to make it go away. I took a trip on Amtrak heading to Sacramento,and it is a sorry thing to see just how far this situation has gone. And what bothers me is why has no one, including our so-called reps in California, not stopped to evaluate what we are dealing with?

It is not homelessness anymore — it is called a new way of living, being free, no responsibility, no job hunt, no taxes to pay. They get hungry, and they prey on the weak minds of the feel-good citizens of this state. I do agree that we do have some families that fell on bad luck, so we should find a way to get them back on board.

To all you high paid reps, think about this, if this situation continues, we might have to cut your jobs, no taxes, no revenue to collect. The idea to hire more people to clean the messes they leave behind is going to get old in the long run.

Jess B. Hernandez, Fresno

Catching cats, not cat burglar

I have a story of a police officer protecting and serving as a humanitarian. One recent night, as I was getting into my friend’s vehicle ready to leave for the night, I have cats that I love, and sometimes I find one or two sometimes hit and killed by cars. I saw two in the middle of the street — it was too late for me to jump out and save, but the car was coming. To my surprise, it was a cop car who flashes his lights and siren, and my cats were running to safety.

I was so relieved and grateful, but the police officer had already driven off. The police are very busy saving us, but when they have time to save someone’s pets, they are doing a great job.

Thank you, Fresno PD.

Angela Lara, Fresno

Beloved, or slap at original people?

In reference to the story, “Store owner pleads for return of beloved wooden ‘Indian man’” that ran on July 10, I ask this simple question: To whom is this effigy “beloved”?

Is it “beloved” to the original people of what is now Centerville? Did the reporter or headline writer consider asking members of the Choinumni Tribe about their feelings? Did these same individuals even realize the store in question is located inside the ancestral homeland of the Choinumni? Why would an effigy so blatantly offensive be described as ‘beloved”? Would The Bee dare describe an equally offensive and racist stolen lawn jockey as “beloved”?

This is just one more example of how thoughtless and dismissive our society can be when it comes to the original people. These people pass us by every day and they do so anonymously. They go about their workaday lives astride two worlds. They are people firmly rooted to ancient and sacred home places — places like Centerville and the adjacent Kings River. Yes, the descendants of the original people are all around us. They are our neighbors, friends, business associates and casual acquaintances, and they are the descendants of Fresno County’s first human beings. Is an awareness of and simple respect for their lives too much to ask?

Mike Smith, Fresno

  Comments