Letters to the Editor

Leaving California: Letters to the editor, July 12, 2019

Linda Miranda, 62, stands near her encampment where she lives with around 25 other homeless people underneath the 405 freeway on Venice Blvd. in Los Angeles on June 4, 2019. “It’s increased tremendously,” Miranda said about the rise in homelessness in the encampment.
Linda Miranda, 62, stands near her encampment where she lives with around 25 other homeless people underneath the 405 freeway on Venice Blvd. in Los Angeles on June 4, 2019. “It’s increased tremendously,” Miranda said about the rise in homelessness in the encampment. Los Angeles Times/TNS



Fiala missing point on California

Andrew Fiala tells us nobody is leaving California and “people keep coming here,” but in fact net outmigration has been in the millions for the past several decades. A recent survey showed that 51% of those polled were considering leaving the state; among millenials the figure was 63%. Among the reasons: high taxes, high cost of living, unaffordable housing, and a failed public school system. More ominously, several large corporations (including Toyota, Nissan, and Occidental Petroleum) have left due to burdensome regulations that increase the cost of doing business. Those are jobs leaving the state, which can only increase California’s infamous wealth gap.

Fiala extols the Black Panthers, pornography, the drug culture, and sexual adventurism as cultural liberators freeing us from the constraints of “tired traditional norms.” Shared traditions provide a constant moral compass, which fosters trust in a citizenry by demanding predictable ethical behavior. An “anything goes” society is no society at all and one slippery step from an Hobbesian state of nature and the “war of all against all.” It is clear that Professor Fiala is a moral relativist navigating life without a compass. Unfortunately his type seem to be the dominant players on college faculties.

Michael Freeman, Sanger

Cox thanked for supporting parks

Thank you Congressman Cox for doing the right thing. There is a bipartisan-supported bill that could benefit the entire state of California — including parks and recreation sites in our region as well as Yosemite National Park and Sequoia National Forest. Lawmakers are working together to ensure the Land and Water Conservation Fund receives the $900 million per year it has been assigned and our congressman has already signed on his support.

For more than 50 years the Land and Water Conservation Fund has supported national parks, wildlife refuges and forests along with everything that helps make California so unique and desirable to live in and visit. We are lucky enough to have some of the most beautiful recreation areas in the country, and we need to preserve them.

Protecting these areas is not only the right thing to do, but it’s important for our economy as well. Outdoor recreation also is a major economic benefit to our state and the Fresno region in particular. We need more of our lawmakers to follow Mr. Cox’s lead and cast their votes to permanently fund this bill, therefore protecting our national, state and local parks, as well as other community conservation projects.

Vernon Crowder, Fresno







Democrats have created crisis

According to three sources (NYT, Wash. Post, Wash. Examiner) the House of Representative’s border funding bill specifically excluded any funding for additional beds. While happily the Senate bill prevailed, the Democrats have shown themselves to be hypocrites of the worst kind when they slam the current administration for poor detention center conditions that they, the Democrats, have worked hard both to create and to prolong.

Yes, it’s a manufactured crisis, and they manufactured it and they don’t want it to go away or to get better. Sick. Depraved. and the worst adjective of all, political.

James M. Spitze, Sanger



Gun violence program needed

I am a youth community organizer in Fresno, and I am also a victim of gun violence. In August of 2015 my older brother Deondre Howard lost his life as a result of gun violence. Since losing my brother, I have worked with people on the front lines trying to prevent gun violence. It is from this community of people that I learned about Advance Peace, a program that stops shootings by mentoring people believed to be involved in gun violence through empowering the people that understand them the most.

Recently, Mayor Brand vetoed Advance Peace, saying that some things had to go because the city budget was too high. I am disappointed by this, and I feel that let down those of us who have to live with the loss of our loved ones as the result of gun violence. A program like Advance Peace could have prevented tragedies like what happened to my brother and Kayla Foster. Advance Peace is not a program that came down mysteriously from the sky, it is a program that victims of gun violence and people who are working on the front lines brought to the city because they saw its potential.

Keion White, Fresno

  Comments