Letters to the Editor

Nike shoes and Kaepernick: Letters to the editor, July 4, 2019

This undated product image obtained by the Associated Press shows Nike Air Max 1 Quick Strike Fourth of July shoes that have a U.S. flag with 13 white stars in a circle on it, known as the Betsy Ross flag, on them. Nike is pulling the flag-themed tennis shoe after former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick complained to the shoemaker, according to the Wall Street Journal.
This undated product image obtained by the Associated Press shows Nike Air Max 1 Quick Strike Fourth of July shoes that have a U.S. flag with 13 white stars in a circle on it, known as the Betsy Ross flag, on them. Nike is pulling the flag-themed tennis shoe after former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick complained to the shoemaker, according to the Wall Street Journal. AP

Possible answer is to boycott Nike

When a company like Nike bows to a single individual because he doesn’t like something, then that company should just up and quit their business.

Just because (Colin) Kaepernick finds our beautiful flag offensive (he should leave our country, if that is the case) Nike pulled their Betsy Ross shoes. I found the Betsy Ross flag on the back of the shoe wonderful and very patriotic.

Maybe America should boycott Nike.

Peggy Lang, Fresno

Support education, or it’s just rhetoric

I agree with the Influencer article by Dan Schnur (The Bee, June 30). It’s time to increase funding for higher education. As a budget officer at two CSU campuses (now retired), I have seen the continued budget cuts to higher education over the years, and the impact on students.

At one time the state provided 70% of the cost of instruction, with the student paying 30%. In the 2019-20 budget, the state provides 55% and the students 45%. Our state and national Democratic Party leaders have made higher education one of their talking points. Why then do they continue to ignore higher education here in California?

It’s time for our Democratic-controlled state to put their money (our money) where their mouths are. Or maybe their higher education rhetoric is just that — rhetoric.

John Waayers, Fresno

Opioid crisis and news crisis similar

If you don’t like the free press in America — mostly newspapers and network television — you have many choices. It’s like the opioid crisis — there is a powerful, addictive news pill you can take to satisfy any political position. (Full disclosure requires I identify myself as a retired newspaper journalist.)

But here is the irony: The mainstream free press that takes care to hire professionals, those with experience and specific journalism training, are the targets in the “fake news” food fight while the hyperpartisan “news” websites manufacture narratives that pretend to give us the “real story.” The mainstream free press falls down occasionally, sure, but it remains the most reliable source for accurate, balanced information.

These new partisan sources — staffed with ideologues — feed the vicious crossfire that has killed reasoned debate. Take your daily opioid and throw figurative bombs. Call your neighbors traitors, idiots, corrupt, anti-Christian, pro-criminal, socialist, racist, and bigoted if they disagree with you.

The opioid drug crisis is finally getting attention because it is killing thousands of Americans every year. I hope the partisan crisis afflicting news consumption comes into focus soon. If not, I fear a harsh reckoning for America.

Michael Patrick Reddin, Clovis

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