Letters to the Editor

Duty to death penalty: Letters to the editor, March 17, 2019

San Quentin State Prison, in San Quentin, Calif., March 13, 2019. Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a moratorium on capital punishment on Wednesday, granting a temporary reprieve for the 737 inmates on California’s death row. Due in part to legal challenges, California has not executed a prisoner since 2006.
San Quentin State Prison, in San Quentin, Calif., March 13, 2019. Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a moratorium on capital punishment on Wednesday, granting a temporary reprieve for the 737 inmates on California’s death row. Due in part to legal challenges, California has not executed a prisoner since 2006. NYT

Duty to fulfill death verdicts

Gov. Gavin Newsom has stated he “will not oversee the execution of any individual,” regardless of how heinous the crime. Serial killers and cold-blooded murderers are not “any” individual.

Death Row inmates, in cases of questionable guilt, should be afforded legal representation and deferment; however, those convicted by irrefutable evidence or self-admission have forfeited their “inalienable rights.” The death penalty is not “murder;” rather, an execution administered to someone “legally” convicted of a capital crime, as well as a permanent “protective” excision of a societal cancer.

Since there is no indication of “divine” intervention to prevent carnage, safeguard innocents or dispense justice, we have a collective responsibility to honor jury directives, rather than assign judgment to an indeterminate “hereafter.”

Paula Ann Costis, Fresno

Drought, floods have common cause

In the Fresno Bee (March 13) a letter from Rod Jenson pointed out his confusion about some of the statements made about climate change; specifically, more droughts or more flooding? The answer is that we will see both, and a lot more catastrophic events caused by our production of atmospheric carbon. There will not only be drought, but fires that will make 2018 seem like a friendly marshmallow roast. There will be flooding the likes of which we have never seen. Sea levels will rise, crop production will fall and millions will starve.

It is unfortunate that what we are now seeing as the many aspects of global climate disruption originally were called “global warming.” That made it seem pretty benign, as if we could cope by no longer wearing long-sleeved shirts. Then we would get a freak snowstorm in June somewhere and folks would run about saying “this can’t be global warming, it is all a hoax!”

There will never again be a “new normal.” The Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and natural environment are spinning out of control, and we seem oblivious. There might be some hope if our politicians embraced things like the Paris Climate Accord and the Green New Deal, but I doubt that they will. Even if they do, and we somehow immediately eliminate all fossil fuel production and use, worldwide, we will see a 2-3 degree (C) increase in the global temperature. Even that will be devastating, but maybe survivable.

Sometimes I am glad that I am 79 years old, but I cry for our children and grandchildren.

George Burman, Fresno

This ‘Tim Cook Apple’ lie a whopper

It’s no secret we have all lied at one point to stay out of trouble, to hide something or to prevent hurt feeliings. This brings to mind the POTUS recently calling Tim Cook, Tim Apple. No big deal, right? The verbal/mental miscue was good for a few jokes from comedians and then it would go away.

However, the POTUS could not let this stand. He stated the he said Tim Cook Apple very fast and Cook softly. Why in the world would he lie about such a trivial matter? I don’t know.

Once he was called on this whopper, he stated that what he said was to save time by calling Tim Cook, Tim Apple. I had to laugh! Is it faster to say apple than cook?

What is most troubling to me about this is not that the POTUS would lie about such a trivial matter, but that a large number of people in our country believe whatever he says.

Rod Palmer, Visalia

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