Letters to the Editor

Death penalty: Letters to the editor, Dec. 28, 2018

In this Aug. 16, 2016 photo, a condemned inmate is led out of his east block cell on death row at San Quentin State Prison. A pair of suspected fatal overdoses on California's death row added urgency to an effort to allow prison guards and even inmates to carry a drug that can save the lives of those who overdose on opioids.
In this Aug. 16, 2016 photo, a condemned inmate is led out of his east block cell on death row at San Quentin State Prison. A pair of suspected fatal overdoses on California's death row added urgency to an effort to allow prison guards and even inmates to carry a drug that can save the lives of those who overdose on opioids. AP file

Today’s letters to the editor were submitted by students at the Center for Advanced Research and Technology, the program offered to high school juniors and seniors in Clovis Unified and Fresno Unified school districts.

Death penalty is useless method

According to the website deathpenaltyinfo.org, it costs over $1 million in taxpayers dollars to house an inmate on death row compared to $740,000 to house an inmate not on death row. Most inmates die awaiting their execution date anyway, so what exactly is the need for the death penalty?

The death penalty does serve as justice for the families of the victims. Except isn’t it enough that these inmates are serving life sentences with years of suffering and loneliness ahead of them. Americans would rather give these criminals the sweet release of death through injection than letting them rot in prison for decades on end.

These criminals have taken innocent lives, but so has the death penalty. Many inmates have been wrongfully accused or have been truly innocent, but this is not found out until after they are dead by lethal injection. The federal government has then committed the act of murder, making it no different than those criminals on death row.

Noemi Montes, Fresno

Students need to be the change

Can you hear me? This is a thought that goes through many students’ minds every day in school. Because of a curriculum brought on by an administration that does not understand students’ needs, schools have become more about what grade students get on a test and less about the students themselves.

As a student , I feel that it is my responsibility to bring this problem to light. Do students have a voice anymore, or is their First Amendment right to freedom of speech being taken away, not because they aren’t using it, but because they do not know that they have it?

I was reminded of this when I was talking to a friend the other day; the friend had broken an arm in P.E, and wanted to prevent that from happening to anyone else . The only problem was that my friend did not know how to make others aware. That is why it is important for students to learn that they have a voice that they can use.

It’s time for more students to start speaking up and creating change where they want it to occur. In the words of John F. Kennedy, “ Change is the law of life…”

Irelan Fletcher, Fresno

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