Letters to the Editor

Be an American: Letters to the editor, Dec. 27, 2018

People visit the field of field Pickett’s Charge in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the scene of one of the great speeches delivered byPresident Abraham Lincoln. He told of the sacrifices made by Union and Confederate forces during the U.S. Civil War.
People visit the field of field Pickett’s Charge in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, the scene of one of the great speeches delivered byPresident Abraham Lincoln. He told of the sacrifices made by Union and Confederate forces during the U.S. Civil War. AP file

This week The Bee is publishing letters to the editor that were submitted by students at the Center for Advanced Research and Technology, the program offered to high school juniors and seniors in Clovis Unified and Fresno Unified school districts.

Time to be an American

Stop being blind, America. Our history books tell us that the Civil War ended in 1865, yet it really began shortly after the nation’s conception. It continues to rage on today, bringing fruition and confirmation to Abraham Lincoln’s ominous and foretelling statement, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

Two parties dominate our precious American politics. Each with their own agendas, working as shepherds who herd all blind voters like sheep, into an engulfing, cultish devotion to that respected party.

Don’t feed into hate or fear, don’t pick the lesser of two evils. There are more than two options. Keep an open mind and stop contributing to the flawed two-party system that pits neighbors and families against each other. Vote third party in 2020. Be an American. Not a Democrat or a Republican.

Austin Donovan, Clovis

Need to change the culture

Racism, stereotypes, and even gender equality are culture problems and not political problems. This was not a case with the Civil Right Movement of the 1950s and ‘60s where segregation was built into the law.

Legally speaking, there is equality between races and genders. However, culturally there are stigmas and stereotypes about each party. This leads to hatred and feelings of inequality between groups of people.

However, these stereotypes and the hearts of the people can only be changed by their choice, not a new law or policy. This a cultural problem and needs to be solved by the people.

Advocates for rights and change need to focus on challenging the way people perceive their group if they really want change.

Yashwant Mahal, Fresno

Beyond divide and conquor politics

“Cheers to everyone smart enough to not fall for the political divide-and-conquer agenda. Because if they keep us busy fighting each other, we will never focus on who the real enemy is.”

Though anonymous, I believe this quote makes a wise point. Politics and government were created to keep order and unify a nation. However, we have allowed politics the power to tear people apart. People aren’t human beings anymore, they’re Democrats or Republicans. Voting was established to give the people a voice, but instead, we use it to silence the voice of others. How can we see the good within one another when our vision is impaired by a distorted filter of red, white and blue? We judge by the ballot rather than the heart.

How long will it take us to realize that arguing amongst people, with no real power, will not result in change? We will never know the true power we hold until we stop debating with our neighbor and start embracing them. In the end, whether red or blue, we all bleed the same color and need to start acting like it. Once we do, we can finally walk into a brighter future.

Emily Branch, Clovis

Missing, murdered indigenous women

In the United States and Canada there is a social epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women. According to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, as of 2014 there were 1,818 known cases of MMIW; 225 of those cases remain unsolved. The same study estimated that indigenous women only make up 4.3 percent of the Canadian population, but 16 percent of all murdered women and 11 percent of all missing women.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada found in Ontario 90 percent of the MMIW were mothers, estimating 440 children affected, creating a rise of indigenous children in foster care.

The United States Department of Justice found that Native American women are murdered at 10 times the national average, statistics are subject to be higher due to the fact that only 47 out of the over 500 tribes are part of the DOJ tribal access program. The FBI’s National Crime Database in 2017 had 633 open cases of missing indigenous women. This leads to a question: why isn’t this being talked about? It’s the least discussed national epidemic. When will indigenous women and their families see justice?

Hear their stories, say her name.

Frank Deanda, Fresno

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