Letters to the Editor

Armenian Genocide: Letters to the editor, Dec. 15, 2018

Armenians and community members hold signs and flags while listening to speakers during the annual Armenian flag-raising ceremony to commemorate the victims and survivors of the Armenian Genocide. The event was held outside Fresno City Hall last April.
Armenians and community members hold signs and flags while listening to speakers during the annual Armenian flag-raising ceremony to commemorate the victims and survivors of the Armenian Genocide. The event was held outside Fresno City Hall last April. Fresno Bee file

Time to recognize Armenian Genocide

Ever since the Armenian Genocide of 1915, Armenian Americans have demanded that the United States recognize Turkey’s actions as an act of genocide.

The Turkish government perpetrated the Armenian Genocide, which happened just over a hundred years ago, and there are no statutes of limitation for mass murder. The moral fabric of America stands for human rights. Armenian Americans are asking for our government to approach this topic in a civil manner; we are asking for a formal recognition, which is the best way to justify that America truly cares about humanitarian issues.

Otherwise, if President Trump does not acknowledge the Armenian Genocide, it shows that he, along with previous presidents, has been subject to continuous political influence by the Turkish government. This results in our country’s sacred principle of human rights being diminished.

I am a second-generation Armenian American and it amazes me that my great-grandparents survived and emigrated to the United States to flee persecution. I am appalled by the United States’ lack of serious interest with this issue and demand a formal recognition from President Trump.

If the Germans were held accountable for genocide, why can’t the Turkish government also be held accountable for the same crime?

Aren Sanikian, Fresno

Security need at key Clovis park

My letter comes to you after a visit to a park in Clovis called Dry Creek Park where we encountered many homeless people. Our purpose that morning was to get in some walking/jogging along the beautiful trail. It’s extremely scary when the jogging population along the trail is overwhelmed by homeless people hiding beneath the trees in desolate areas.

Please institute weekly security sweeps along the trails and within parks. I have noticed many homeless building shelters underneath picnic benches. This is unacceptable, as mothers stroll their young children to these neighborhood parks to get some exercise and allow their little ones to be little ones and play. To run around the grounds of the beautiful park and play on the equipment is how it was designed for the children of our cities. When parents arrive at our parks and see a bunch of homeless people laying around, they retreat due to the unpredictable nature and behavior of the homeless’ demeanor.

I request heightened security patrols in our parks and increase safety awareness by introducing public “safety protocols.” Parks can be safe places for social gatherings, physical education programs, and community events.

Taylor Mallow, Buchanan High School, Clovis

Bipartisan bill good for climate

Stop the presses — bipartisan cooperation has just been detected in Congress! The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (HR 7173) was introduced by Republicans Brian Fitzpatrick and Francis Rooney and Democrats Ted Deutch, John Delaney, and Charlie Crist. Its goal is to “drive down America’s carbon pollution and bring climate change under control, while unleashing American technology innovation and ingenuity.”

This bill would greatly benefit the air quality of our San Joaquin Valley by encouraging the shift from fossil fuels to clean energy, and at the same time put money in people’s pockets with a monthly carbon dividend check.

It’s a bill that both red and blue America can get behind. Let’s tell Congress we want bipartisan action on climate change, and help preserve a healthy climate for our children and grandchildren.

Jennifer Martin, Fresno

Wonders about value of dress code

Schools care more about what kids are wearing rather than trying to better the kids’ education and safety.

Kids should be able to wear a wider variety of clothes. We go to public schools, meaning if we want to have to wear a uniform and be told what we can and cannot wear, we would go to a private schools. For example, backless shoes. How are backless shoes “dangerous” or “revealing”? We come to school to learn and get an education, not to focus on what we wear.

I understand somethings are too revealing, however the majority of in-dress-code clothes are hard to find, especially for girls. Schools claim that clothes are “too revealing” when we show our kneecaps or shoulders or bra straps. Schools should be teaching boys and girls to keep themselves controlled and focus on school. Also, schools claim to be preparing us for college and the real world, yet in college and the real world, we don’t have a dress code.

Leila Perez, Fresno

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