Bill Gurolnick talks with his wife, Peggy Bartelstein, at their home in Northbrook, Ill.. Gurolnick, who turns 87 in March 2018, is participating in a study at Northwestern University that researchers hope will help them understand why some people in their 80s and 90s are able to keep the same sharp memory as someone 20 or 30 years younger.
Bill Gurolnick talks with his wife, Peggy Bartelstein, at their home in Northbrook, Ill.. Gurolnick, who turns 87 in March 2018, is participating in a study at Northwestern University that researchers hope will help them understand why some people in their 80s and 90s are able to keep the same sharp memory as someone 20 or 30 years younger. Teresa Crawford AP
Bill Gurolnick talks with his wife, Peggy Bartelstein, at their home in Northbrook, Ill.. Gurolnick, who turns 87 in March 2018, is participating in a study at Northwestern University that researchers hope will help them understand why some people in their 80s and 90s are able to keep the same sharp memory as someone 20 or 30 years younger. Teresa Crawford AP

Put more money in Alzeimer’s research

March 03, 2018 03:00 PM