Lori Alhadeff, mother of 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff who was one of 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, stands for a portrait in her home, on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Parkland, Fla. The day of the shooting, she approached a line of reporters. She did not know what to say. But she felt compelled to speak. “A crazy person just walks right into the school, knocked on the window of my child’s door and starts shooting, shooting her and killing her,” she screamed. “President Trump, you say what can you do, you can stop the guns from getting into these children’s hands, put metal detectors at every entrance to the school.”
Lori Alhadeff, mother of 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff who was one of 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, stands for a portrait in her home, on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Parkland, Fla. The day of the shooting, she approached a line of reporters. She did not know what to say. But she felt compelled to speak. “A crazy person just walks right into the school, knocked on the window of my child’s door and starts shooting, shooting her and killing her,” she screamed. “President Trump, you say what can you do, you can stop the guns from getting into these children’s hands, put metal detectors at every entrance to the school.” Brynn Anderson AP Photo
Lori Alhadeff, mother of 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff who was one of 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, stands for a portrait in her home, on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Parkland, Fla. The day of the shooting, she approached a line of reporters. She did not know what to say. But she felt compelled to speak. “A crazy person just walks right into the school, knocked on the window of my child’s door and starts shooting, shooting her and killing her,” she screamed. “President Trump, you say what can you do, you can stop the guns from getting into these children’s hands, put metal detectors at every entrance to the school.” Brynn Anderson AP Photo