California

These 6 California highways are among the most dangerous in the nation, report says

Traffic creeps along northbound Interstate 5 south of Old Sacramento as motorists merge from westbound Highway 50, left, during an evening commute. Interstate 5 is the fourth-most dangerous highway in the United States, according to a report.
Traffic creeps along northbound Interstate 5 south of Old Sacramento as motorists merge from westbound Highway 50, left, during an evening commute. Interstate 5 is the fourth-most dangerous highway in the United States, according to a report. rpench@sacbee.com

If you’re a driver in California, here’s some essential information — six of the nation’s top 50 most dangerous highways are in the Golden State, according to a report.

The report, from finance website ValuePenguin, used data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to rank America’s highways.

Interstate 5, the highway that runs from the Mexican border up through the Central Valley to Oregon, is the fourth most dangerous highway in the country, according to the report.

Read Next

Most of the fatal crashes on I-5 happen in Los Angeles County, where “traffic volumes are likely to be the highest,” the report said. From 2010 to 2016, there were 680 fatal crashes on the highway.

Highway 2 in Los Angeles County came in 14th on the list, with 52 fatal crashes between 2010 and 2016. Highway 101 in Santa Clara County was No. 16, with 597 fatal crashes reported in that time period.

Interstate 8 in San Diego County ranked 39 on the list, with 134 fatal crashes. Highway 99 in Kern County, which had 411 fatal crashes in that time span, was 43rd on the list. And Highway 78 in San Diego County — No. 49 — saw 62 fatal crashes.

California Highway Patrol released video of the sideshows that stopped traffic on Sacramento streets and I-5 in the Pocket area. Ten vehicles were seized and 27 citations issued.

Three factors were used to determine the rankings: fatalities per car crash, the percentage of non-fatal crashes and the fatal crashes per vehicle-miles-traveled per capita, according to the report.

In better news, of all the highways ranked across the nation, Highway 101 had the shortest wait time for emergency medical services after a crash. The median delay for first responders on Highway 101 was four minutes, compared with a high of 30 minutes on Texas’ Highway 105.

The report also looked at which American highways saw the most crashes involving drunken drivers. Of that list, only one California highway ranked: 22.1 percent of crashes on Highway 101 involved a drunken driver — below the average of 28.7 percent.

CHP Officer Michael Bradley explains what happened Thursday morning in the crash involving a Fed-Ex truck and a pickup.

Related stories from Fresno Bee

  Comments