Andrew Fiala

To truly pay tribute this Memorial Day, war talk must focus on what is just and right

Loretta Reyna places a flag on the grave of her father, Korean War Army veteran Loman Orum, at the Clovis Cemetery on on Memorial Day, May 28, 2018.
Loretta Reyna places a flag on the grave of her father, Korean War Army veteran Loman Orum, at the Clovis Cemetery on on Memorial Day, May 28, 2018. Fresno Bee file

This Memorial Day, as we remember those who died in war, let’s also consider the moral miasma that leads to war. The fog of war refers to the complexity and uncertainty of war. But war is often preceded by a moral miasma, a noxious smog of hubris and hot air. The louder the war drums, the worse for critical moral judgment.

Threats are made. Strategic interests are calculated. Troops are deployed. Leaders thump their chests. Each side misjudges the other. Intelligence gathering is politicized. Shots are fired. Escalation occurs. And more names are added to the grim roster of Memorial Day.

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