Rohingya refugees Sitara Begum with her son Mohammed Abbas, who are in the list for repatriation, wait in their shelter at Jamtoli refugee camp, near Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, on Nov. 15, 2018. Bangladesh authorities said that repatriation to Myanmar of some of the more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who fled army-led violence will begin as scheduled if people are willing to go, despite calls from United Nations officials and human rights groups for the refugees’ safety in their homeland to be verified first.
Rohingya refugees Sitara Begum with her son Mohammed Abbas, who are in the list for repatriation, wait in their shelter at Jamtoli refugee camp, near Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, on Nov. 15, 2018. Bangladesh authorities said that repatriation to Myanmar of some of the more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who fled army-led violence will begin as scheduled if people are willing to go, despite calls from United Nations officials and human rights groups for the refugees’ safety in their homeland to be verified first. Dar Yasin AP
Rohingya refugees Sitara Begum with her son Mohammed Abbas, who are in the list for repatriation, wait in their shelter at Jamtoli refugee camp, near Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, on Nov. 15, 2018. Bangladesh authorities said that repatriation to Myanmar of some of the more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims who fled army-led violence will begin as scheduled if people are willing to go, despite calls from United Nations officials and human rights groups for the refugees’ safety in their homeland to be verified first. Dar Yasin AP