TV

CW’s ‘The Messengers’ has angelic tone

‘The Messengers’ takes heavenly approach

Show is a new direction for CW

Shantel VanSanten likes playing world between good, evil

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Science fiction TV shows and movies have often dealt with religious themes: angels, the Devil, life after death, faith and original sin. Those will all be faced by the players in the new sci-fi CW Network series, “The Messengers.”

The show’s religious themes are clear from the start, when five strangers collapse and miraculously come back to life hours later. They awake to world where they are either on a mission to prevent or cause the Rapture.

Shantel VanSanten, Anna Diop, Jon Fletcher, Sofia Black-D’Elia, Diogo Morgado, JD Pardo, Craig Frank and Joel Courtney star in this series about humanity facing its final days of reckoning.

Executive producer Trey Callaway says these strangers will come together in the second episode.

“We will also, over the course of the season, explore the possibility that they may have crossed before, and that while they have the assistance of some very important mere mortals in their lives, biblically speaking, in terms of the prophecy, that there are actually seven angels of the Apocalypse,” Callaway says. “So that’s something that we can also look forward to as the season goes on, is that they may need to turn to and rely on some other folks they hadn’t counted on necessarily as well.”

Here’s a look at some of the show’s central characters.

Shantel VanSanten (Vera)

Seen her in “Gang Related,” “One Tree Hill”

On doing another CW series: “The CW is such an amazing family. They’re very loyal to the actors who have been on their shows. But I feel like with “Jane the Virgin,” with “The Flash,” with “iZombie,” with these new shows, they’re really trying to create a different energy and change it up.”

Jon Fletcher (Joshua Jr.)

Seen him in “City of Dreams”

On the show’s group dynamic: “The struggle continues throughout the season because they’re all from different places and they’re all bringing different things. And the personal challenges they already are bringing to the table do not just disappear and they stay and that creates more of a struggle, because they’re normal human beings who have now been given these gifts.

Sofia Black-D’Elia (Erin)

You’ve seen her in “Betrayal,” “Gossip Girl”

On acting scenes where her character transforms: “I’m staring at the skyline and there’s nothing really coming, but they explained it kind of like a wave of energy that was coming at you and then, when it hits you, that your body would react and then, similarly, your eyes would dilate and you would die. So your body basically just collapses to the ground.”

Diogo Morgado (The Man)

Seen him on “Son of God,” “Sol de Inverno”

On playing good and evil: “What I love and what I found more interesting about The Man is that the space between a good option and of the struggle between the good and evil inside of each one of us, that’s where The Man lives. The fact that he can manipulate or try to control the outcome of the stories and the outcome of the characters and the outcome of the whole apocalyptic world, it’s among those space of choices.

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