Fresno Beehive

Your favorite websites want to break the internet. And they want you to help

For 48 hours starting Dec. 12, websites like Funny or Die are asking users to help protest net neutrality.
For 48 hours starting Dec. 12, websites like Funny or Die are asking users to help protest net neutrality.

If you haven’t already been inundated with the calls to action against the Federal Communications Commission for its upcoming vote on net neutrality rules, get ready.

For the next 48 hours, defenders of so-called neutrality will dive into a mass protest online against the FCC vote, which a group of internet pioneers –including guys like Steve Wozniak – has urged the Senate to cancel.

Fight the Future is leading the protest with a series of online tools that allow users to have their voices heard.

One allows users to auto-tweet selected messages every 10 minutes. The hope is to blanket Twitter with calls to contact Congress.

On LinkedIn, users are urged to change their job statuses to “Defending Net Neutrality.”

On Facebook, they are urged to list their relationship status as “married” – to net neutrality, obviously.

Websites like Funny or Die, Reddit and BoingBoing have jumped aboard with widgets and banners that demonstrate what life might look like under the new FCC rules. Pornhub (yes ... Pornhub) running a “Slow Porn Sucks” banner across its site. Kickstarter’s homepage has a message to its users, complete with the spinning wheel of death, which has become the defacto symbol of a slow, non-neutral internet.

This isn’t the first virtual protest of its kind.

In 2014, Kickstarter, along with Netflix, Tumblr and others, took part in Internet Slowdown Day, which brought visibility to the cause but didn’t slow down the internet at all, according to The New Yorker.

In 2012, there was a massive internet blackout in protest of several anti-piracy bills passing through Congress. CBS News reported the overall reach of the protest as “staggering.”

Joshua Tehee: 559-441-6479, @joshuatehee

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