Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, joined by lawyer Edward Blum, right, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Dec. 9. The Supreme Court last week ruled in favor of the university and sent a message that admissions officers may continue to consider race as one factor among many in pursuit of a diverse student body.
Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, joined by lawyer Edward Blum, right, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Dec. 9. The Supreme Court last week ruled in favor of the university and sent a message that admissions officers may continue to consider race as one factor among many in pursuit of a diverse student body. J. Scott Applewhite Associated Press file
Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, joined by lawyer Edward Blum, right, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Dec. 9. The Supreme Court last week ruled in favor of the university and sent a message that admissions officers may continue to consider race as one factor among many in pursuit of a diverse student body. J. Scott Applewhite Associated Press file

Being rejected by a school does not make you a victim

June 29, 2016 11:24 AM