Pope Francis passes in front a portrait of Mother Teresa as he is driven through the crowd at the end of a canonization ceremony in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sept. 4. Catholics remain the dominant denomination of the faithful in the U.S. at 21 percent, though more people, 25 percent, state their religion as “none.”
Pope Francis passes in front a portrait of Mother Teresa as he is driven through the crowd at the end of a canonization ceremony in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sept. 4. Catholics remain the dominant denomination of the faithful in the U.S. at 21 percent, though more people, 25 percent, state their religion as “none.” Alessandra Tarantino AP
Pope Francis passes in front a portrait of Mother Teresa as he is driven through the crowd at the end of a canonization ceremony in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sept. 4. Catholics remain the dominant denomination of the faithful in the U.S. at 21 percent, though more people, 25 percent, state their religion as “none.” Alessandra Tarantino AP

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December 17, 2016 2:03 PM

Where is American religion heading?

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