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Little Emma's 18-year-old dad has advice for other teen fathers 1:32

Little Emma's 18-year-old dad has advice for other teen fathers

Fresno teens talk frankly about sex as part of Bee survey 2:09

Fresno teens talk frankly about sex as part of Bee survey

Talking to teens early could help Fresno County reduce number of preterm births 1:37

Talking to teens early could help Fresno County reduce number of preterm births

Fresno County Office of Education’s sex educator tells why teens need help making responsible decisions 2:27

Fresno County Office of Education’s sex educator tells why teens need help making responsible decisions

Teen mother remembers being scared about telling her father the news 2:03

Teen mother remembers being scared about telling her father the news

She didn't realize she was pregnant at 17: 'I didn't know what pregnancy felt like' 2:09

She didn't realize she was pregnant at 17: 'I didn't know what pregnancy felt like'

She got pregnant at 14, but wants her daughter to know, 'she can count on me.' 1:46

She got pregnant at 14, but wants her daughter to know, 'she can count on me.'

Big city mayors ask state for help on homelessness 0:59

Big city mayors ask state for help on homelessness

Evangelist Billy Graham dies at 99 5:13

Evangelist Billy Graham dies at 99

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Round Table Clubhouse’s tap wall features 24 brews

Kayla Wilson, Fresno County Office of Education's sex educator, refutes the concept that some parents and even school board members hold that sex ed will lead to more sexual activities among students. The goal, she says, is to be able to offer teens the options of making healthy decisions, and encouraging discussions between them and their parents or a trusted adult. John Walker The Fresno Bee
Kayla Wilson, Fresno County Office of Education's sex educator, refutes the concept that some parents and even school board members hold that sex ed will lead to more sexual activities among students. The goal, she says, is to be able to offer teens the options of making healthy decisions, and encouraging discussions between them and their parents or a trusted adult. John Walker The Fresno Bee

Sex education is now the law, but conservative school leaders aren’t happy about it

More from the series

Too Young?

The Valley is home to California's highest teenage birth rates. Teen parents say they lack support at school, and sex education is infused with politics.

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August 04, 2017 11:55 AM

More Videos

Little Emma's 18-year-old dad has advice for other teen fathers 1:32

Little Emma's 18-year-old dad has advice for other teen fathers

Fresno teens talk frankly about sex as part of Bee survey 2:09

Fresno teens talk frankly about sex as part of Bee survey

Talking to teens early could help Fresno County reduce number of preterm births 1:37

Talking to teens early could help Fresno County reduce number of preterm births

Fresno County Office of Education’s sex educator tells why teens need help making responsible decisions 2:27

Fresno County Office of Education’s sex educator tells why teens need help making responsible decisions

Teen mother remembers being scared about telling her father the news 2:03

Teen mother remembers being scared about telling her father the news

She didn't realize she was pregnant at 17: 'I didn't know what pregnancy felt like' 2:09

She didn't realize she was pregnant at 17: 'I didn't know what pregnancy felt like'

She got pregnant at 14, but wants her daughter to know, 'she can count on me.' 1:46

She got pregnant at 14, but wants her daughter to know, 'she can count on me.'

Big city mayors ask state for help on homelessness 0:59

Big city mayors ask state for help on homelessness

Evangelist Billy Graham dies at 99 5:13

Evangelist Billy Graham dies at 99

Round Table Clubhouse’s tap wall features 24 brews 1:07

Round Table Clubhouse’s tap wall features 24 brews