In this 2015 photo, poor students are served breakfast at the Stanley Mosk Elementary School in Los Angeles. About 80 percent of Los Angeles Unified School District are considered to be poor or English-learners, qualifying the district for extra state funds to raise their academic achievement. Statewide, about 60 percent of students are considered “at-risk” for poverty or lack of English skills.
In this 2015 photo, poor students are served breakfast at the Stanley Mosk Elementary School in Los Angeles. About 80 percent of Los Angeles Unified School District are considered to be poor or English-learners, qualifying the district for extra state funds to raise their academic achievement. Statewide, about 60 percent of students are considered “at-risk” for poverty or lack of English skills. Nick Ut AP
In this 2015 photo, poor students are served breakfast at the Stanley Mosk Elementary School in Los Angeles. About 80 percent of Los Angeles Unified School District are considered to be poor or English-learners, qualifying the district for extra state funds to raise their academic achievement. Statewide, about 60 percent of students are considered “at-risk” for poverty or lack of English skills. Nick Ut AP

California tolerates failing schools for millions of kids

May 16, 2017 09:01 PM

UPDATED May 16, 2017 05:05 PM

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