Bottles of beer are cleaned using recycled non-potable water during the bottling process at Stone Brewing Co. on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Escondido, Calif. In an effort to reduce water use, the brewery is spending $1 million on expanding its $8 million wastewater treatment system installed in 2008, and aims to use only three gallons of water for every gallon of beer it produces. The treated water is used to clean equipment.
Bottles of beer are cleaned using recycled non-potable water during the bottling process at Stone Brewing Co. on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Escondido, Calif. In an effort to reduce water use, the brewery is spending $1 million on expanding its $8 million wastewater treatment system installed in 2008, and aims to use only three gallons of water for every gallon of beer it produces. The treated water is used to clean equipment.
Bottles of beer are cleaned using recycled non-potable water during the bottling process at Stone Brewing Co. on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Escondido, Calif. In an effort to reduce water use, the brewery is spending $1 million on expanding its $8 million wastewater treatment system installed in 2008, and aims to use only three gallons of water for every gallon of beer it produces. The treated water is used to clean equipment.

The beer is made from sewer water, but it doesn’t taste like what you find in sewers

March 20, 2017 09:55 AM

UPDATED March 20, 2017 01:17 PM

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