Rafters float along the Merced River with Half Dome off in the distance in June 2014. Yosemite National Park’s glacially sculpted landscape holds more than stunning photo ops. This is a living laboratory where scientists can track everything from ants to glaciers. Protected from commercial development, logging, mining and other activities, it’s a scientist’s dream come true, and maybe a key to understanding climate change.
Rafters float along the Merced River with Half Dome off in the distance in June 2014. Yosemite National Park’s glacially sculpted landscape holds more than stunning photo ops. This is a living laboratory where scientists can track everything from ants to glaciers. Protected from commercial development, logging, mining and other activities, it’s a scientist’s dream come true, and maybe a key to understanding climate change. CRAIG KOHLRUSS ckohlruss@fresnobee.com
Rafters float along the Merced River with Half Dome off in the distance in June 2014. Yosemite National Park’s glacially sculpted landscape holds more than stunning photo ops. This is a living laboratory where scientists can track everything from ants to glaciers. Protected from commercial development, logging, mining and other activities, it’s a scientist’s dream come true, and maybe a key to understanding climate change. CRAIG KOHLRUSS ckohlruss@fresnobee.com
Earth Log

Earth Log

The latest on the Valley's water and air-quality issues from Mark Grossi

Yosemite is third-oldest national park, but parks idea was born there

September 28, 2015 03:24 PM

UPDATED September 28, 2015 06:02 PM

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About Mark Grossi

@markgrossi

Mark Grossi has the pulse of the San Joaquin Valley ecosystem, writing since 1993 about subjects such as the region's notorious air quality, the restoration of the San Joaquin River and unhealthy drinking water in rural towns. Twitter: @markgrossi Mark retired from The Bee in October 2015.