Paige Kimble, executive director of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, applauds during the 2014 finals. The Scripps National Spelling Bee has a profound influence on the lives of many young people who participate. Year after year, they keep coming back. Dozens of former spellers will be scattered throughout the live audience when the bee begins on Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Others take on official roles in the competition. The most famous ex-spellers are Kimble and Jacques Bailly, the pronouncer and public face of the bee. They won in back-to-back years: Bailly in 1980, Kimble in 1981.
Paige Kimble, executive director of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, applauds during the 2014 finals. The Scripps National Spelling Bee has a profound influence on the lives of many young people who participate. Year after year, they keep coming back. Dozens of former spellers will be scattered throughout the live audience when the bee begins on Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Others take on official roles in the competition. The most famous ex-spellers are Kimble and Jacques Bailly, the pronouncer and public face of the bee. They won in back-to-back years: Bailly in 1980, Kimble in 1981. Manuel Balce Ceneta Associated Press file
Paige Kimble, executive director of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, applauds during the 2014 finals. The Scripps National Spelling Bee has a profound influence on the lives of many young people who participate. Year after year, they keep coming back. Dozens of former spellers will be scattered throughout the live audience when the bee begins on Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Others take on official roles in the competition. The most famous ex-spellers are Kimble and Jacques Bailly, the pronouncer and public face of the bee. They won in back-to-back years: Bailly in 1980, Kimble in 1981. Manuel Balce Ceneta Associated Press file

Ex-spellers remain involved with National Spelling Bee

May 23, 2016 04:31 PM

UPDATED May 23, 2016 04:59 PM

More Videos

  • Teachers of color help connect with students

    Jeff Copeland is one of only two black teachers at Sequoia Middle School in Fresno Unified.“You want to get people that are really passionate about kids, no matter what they look like. But it’d be great if they were people of color,” says Copeland, a Fresno State graduate.