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Clovis East teacher Ken Dias shown support at CUSD board meeting 1:20

Clovis East teacher Ken Dias shown support at CUSD board meeting

Fire leaves service shop destroyed at Paul Evert's RV Country 0:58

Fire leaves service shop destroyed at Paul Evert's RV Country

Paul Evert's RV Country engulfed in flames 0:42

Paul Evert's RV Country engulfed in flames

Freeze hits valley crops, but citrus growers think they may escape much damage 0:58

Freeze hits valley crops, but citrus growers think they may escape much damage

Hazmat team investigates report of fumes from package at TV station 0:44

Hazmat team investigates report of fumes from package at TV station

Madera police chief reacts to the shooting death 9-year-old boy 0:53

Madera police chief reacts to the shooting death 9-year-old boy

Fresno’s Q bus line: A new day for Fresno’s transportation 1:19

Fresno’s Q bus line: A new day for Fresno’s transportation

Fresno girl in 'Rachael Ray' student cooking contest has an amazing story to tell 1:10

Fresno girl in 'Rachael Ray' student cooking contest has an amazing story to tell

Police presence stepped up in light of social media threat at Sunnyside and Edison high schools 0:42

Police presence stepped up in light of social media threat at Sunnyside and Edison high schools

River Partners restoration ecologist Heyo Tjarks explains how 2,000 native trees and shrubs are being planted as part of a Wildlife Habitat Restoration Project on Saturday morning, January 30, 2016, at Riverbottom Park in Fresno. Approximately 100 volunteers helped plant 18 acres near the San Joaquin River with the goal to restore the habitat for local wildlife and threatened and endangered species. SILVIA FLORES sflores@fresnobee.com
River Partners restoration ecologist Heyo Tjarks explains how 2,000 native trees and shrubs are being planted as part of a Wildlife Habitat Restoration Project on Saturday morning, January 30, 2016, at Riverbottom Park in Fresno. Approximately 100 volunteers helped plant 18 acres near the San Joaquin River with the goal to restore the habitat for local wildlife and threatened and endangered species. SILVIA FLORES sflores@fresnobee.com

New trees will help restore wildlife habitat along San Joaquin River

January 30, 2016 05:53 PM

More Videos

Clovis East teacher Ken Dias shown support at CUSD board meeting 1:20

Clovis East teacher Ken Dias shown support at CUSD board meeting

Fire leaves service shop destroyed at Paul Evert's RV Country 0:58

Fire leaves service shop destroyed at Paul Evert's RV Country

Paul Evert's RV Country engulfed in flames 0:42

Paul Evert's RV Country engulfed in flames

Freeze hits valley crops, but citrus growers think they may escape much damage 0:58

Freeze hits valley crops, but citrus growers think they may escape much damage

Hazmat team investigates report of fumes from package at TV station 0:44

Hazmat team investigates report of fumes from package at TV station

Madera police chief reacts to the shooting death 9-year-old boy 0:53

Madera police chief reacts to the shooting death 9-year-old boy

Fresno’s Q bus line: A new day for Fresno’s transportation 1:19

Fresno’s Q bus line: A new day for Fresno’s transportation

Fresno girl in 'Rachael Ray' student cooking contest has an amazing story to tell 1:10

Fresno girl in 'Rachael Ray' student cooking contest has an amazing story to tell

Police presence stepped up in light of social media threat at Sunnyside and Edison high schools 0:42

Police presence stepped up in light of social media threat at Sunnyside and Edison high schools