Mercury News reporter Troy Wolverton “walks the plank” while using an Oculus Rift virtual reality system as lab manager Shawnee Baughman, left, and researcher Elise Ogle look on at Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab. Consumers will soon have their pick of four high-profile virtual systems from major electronics companies, including Facebook’s Oculus Rift.
Mercury News reporter Troy Wolverton “walks the plank” while using an Oculus Rift virtual reality system as lab manager Shawnee Baughman, left, and researcher Elise Ogle look on at Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab. Consumers will soon have their pick of four high-profile virtual systems from major electronics companies, including Facebook’s Oculus Rift. Patrick Tehan Bay Area News Group
Mercury News reporter Troy Wolverton “walks the plank” while using an Oculus Rift virtual reality system as lab manager Shawnee Baughman, left, and researcher Elise Ogle look on at Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab. Consumers will soon have their pick of four high-profile virtual systems from major electronics companies, including Facebook’s Oculus Rift. Patrick Tehan Bay Area News Group

Troy Wolverton: Virtual reality offers promise and problems

July 01, 2015 8:42 AM

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