In this March 26, 2015, file photo, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray speaks during a panel discussion in Richmond, Va.Since it opened for business five years ago, the bureau estimates it has returned about $12 billion to some 27 million consumers harmed by deceitful or questionable financial practices. Yet eviscerating the bureau is high on the to-do list of both President-elect Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers. Trump has vowed to “dismantle” Dodd-Frank, the financial reform law that put banks on a tighter leash and created the CFPB after the 2007 subprime mortgage crisis. House Republicans this month passed a bill, known as the “REINS Act,” that would limit federal agencies’ rule-making ability.
In this March 26, 2015, file photo, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray speaks during a panel discussion in Richmond, Va.Since it opened for business five years ago, the bureau estimates it has returned about $12 billion to some 27 million consumers harmed by deceitful or questionable financial practices. Yet eviscerating the bureau is high on the to-do list of both President-elect Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers. Trump has vowed to “dismantle” Dodd-Frank, the financial reform law that put banks on a tighter leash and created the CFPB after the 2007 subprime mortgage crisis. House Republicans this month passed a bill, known as the “REINS Act,” that would limit federal agencies’ rule-making ability. Steve Helber Associated Press file
In this March 26, 2015, file photo, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray speaks during a panel discussion in Richmond, Va.Since it opened for business five years ago, the bureau estimates it has returned about $12 billion to some 27 million consumers harmed by deceitful or questionable financial practices. Yet eviscerating the bureau is high on the to-do list of both President-elect Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers. Trump has vowed to “dismantle” Dodd-Frank, the financial reform law that put banks on a tighter leash and created the CFPB after the 2007 subprime mortgage crisis. House Republicans this month passed a bill, known as the “REINS Act,” that would limit federal agencies’ rule-making ability. Steve Helber Associated Press file

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Hey, America, wake up and beware of a post-consumer watchdog world

January 14, 2017 1:37 PM

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