In this Oct. 27, 2015, photo, Ali Clark displays a Mexican sour gherkin at Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb. Urban farms and community gardens have been a celebrated trend for years, but as more people look to live and work in central cities, growers says it’s harder to find and remain on land now sought by developers.
In this Oct. 27, 2015, photo, Ali Clark displays a Mexican sour gherkin at Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb. Urban farms and community gardens have been a celebrated trend for years, but as more people look to live and work in central cities, growers says it’s harder to find and remain on land now sought by developers. Nati Harnik The Associated Press
In this Oct. 27, 2015, photo, Ali Clark displays a Mexican sour gherkin at Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb. Urban farms and community gardens have been a celebrated trend for years, but as more people look to live and work in central cities, growers says it’s harder to find and remain on land now sought by developers. Nati Harnik The Associated Press

Urban farmers find that success leads to eviction

November 27, 2015 11:34 AM

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