Scientist David Morgan holds a test tube containing predatory wasps, Tamarixia radiata, after breeding at the California Department of Food and Agriculture hothouses in Riverside. The wasp is used to attack the Asian citrus psyllid, a parasite which contains a bacteria which is deadly to citrus trees.
Scientist David Morgan holds a test tube containing predatory wasps, Tamarixia radiata, after breeding at the California Department of Food and Agriculture hothouses in Riverside. The wasp is used to attack the Asian citrus psyllid, a parasite which contains a bacteria which is deadly to citrus trees. Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times
Scientist David Morgan holds a test tube containing predatory wasps, Tamarixia radiata, after breeding at the California Department of Food and Agriculture hothouses in Riverside. The wasp is used to attack the Asian citrus psyllid, a parasite which contains a bacteria which is deadly to citrus trees. Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times

Scientists use wasps to protect citrus crops from disease

August 21, 2015 12:30 PM

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