Law enforcement and community leaders will discuss how to “work together to create a united front against hate” during a panel at Fresno State on Sept. 14 that will follow a screening of “Waking in Oak Creek” – a 33-minute film about how a Wisconsin community responded after six worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist during a prayer service in 2012.
Law enforcement and community leaders will discuss how to “work together to create a united front against hate” during a panel at Fresno State on Sept. 14 that will follow a screening of “Waking in Oak Creek” – a 33-minute film about how a Wisconsin community responded after six worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist during a prayer service in 2012. ERIC PAUL ZAMORA Fresno Bee file
Law enforcement and community leaders will discuss how to “work together to create a united front against hate” during a panel at Fresno State on Sept. 14 that will follow a screening of “Waking in Oak Creek” – a 33-minute film about how a Wisconsin community responded after six worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist during a prayer service in 2012. ERIC PAUL ZAMORA Fresno Bee file

Religion notes for Aug. 27: News, events from Valley’s faith community

August 26, 2016 02:06 PM