Pictured, from left: Kirk Sherriff, chief of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Fresno, Ike Grewal of the Sikh Council of Central California, Reza Nekumanesh, director of the Islamic Cultural Center of Fresno, and Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer during a panel at Fresno State on Wednesday night aimed to “create a united front against hate” following a screening of “Waking in Oak Creek” – a 33-minute film about how a Wisconsin community responded after six worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist during a prayer service in 2012.
Pictured, from left: Kirk Sherriff, chief of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Fresno, Ike Grewal of the Sikh Council of Central California, Reza Nekumanesh, director of the Islamic Cultural Center of Fresno, and Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer during a panel at Fresno State on Wednesday night aimed to “create a united front against hate” following a screening of “Waking in Oak Creek” – a 33-minute film about how a Wisconsin community responded after six worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist during a prayer service in 2012. CARMEN GEORGE cgeorge@fresnobee.com
Pictured, from left: Kirk Sherriff, chief of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Fresno, Ike Grewal of the Sikh Council of Central California, Reza Nekumanesh, director of the Islamic Cultural Center of Fresno, and Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer during a panel at Fresno State on Wednesday night aimed to “create a united front against hate” following a screening of “Waking in Oak Creek” – a 33-minute film about how a Wisconsin community responded after six worshipers at a Sikh temple were killed by a white supremacist during a prayer service in 2012. CARMEN GEORGE cgeorge@fresnobee.com

Violence against Sikhs, Muslims, decried by leaders at Fresno State panel

September 14, 2016 10:33 PM